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Between the Eagle and the Sun: Traces of Japan (review)

Between the Eagle and the Sun: Traces of Japan (review) REVIEWS nities, the topos seems to establish a slim, subliminal possibility for shared symbolism. Teachers ofWestern literature may recall how Catholic and Protestant students can both recognize their own religious positions in Goethe's Faust. Still, despite the affinities that comparatists might feel with this book's crosscultural range, they will not find much direct engagement with their field, in the spirit of Edward Said's remarks on Erich Auerbach in Culture and Imperialism. One essay mentions Salman Rushdie's connection with the idea of "comparative world literature in English" (363), but does not develop the argument. Françoise Lionnet comments pointedly on cultural comparisons, but despite her contribution to the Bernheimer report on comparative literature, she has anthropology in mind here. Her conclusion, that "it is not the existence of different cultures that induces a comparative . . . approach," but a comparatist stance that "creates an arbitrary and singular object" which becomes the given culture (121), implies that comparative literature encourages some ofthe very divisions it proposes to remedy. Instead of these "separate but equal" categories, Lionnet and many of her fellow essayists prefer to invoke creolism, métissage, and especially hybridity, all of which involve cultural identities which mingle several traditions http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Between the Eagle and the Sun: Traces of Japan (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 21 (1) – Oct 3, 1997

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS nities, the topos seems to establish a slim, subliminal possibility for shared symbolism. Teachers ofWestern literature may recall how Catholic and Protestant students can both recognize their own religious positions in Goethe's Faust. Still, despite the affinities that comparatists might feel with this book's crosscultural range, they will not find much direct engagement with their field, in the spirit of Edward Said's remarks on Erich Auerbach in Culture and Imperialism. One essay mentions Salman Rushdie's connection with the idea of "comparative world literature in English" (363), but does not develop the argument. Françoise Lionnet comments pointedly on cultural comparisons, but despite her contribution to the Bernheimer report on comparative literature, she has anthropology in mind here. Her conclusion, that "it is not the existence of different cultures that induces a comparative . . . approach," but a comparatist stance that "creates an arbitrary and singular object" which becomes the given culture (121), implies that comparative literature encourages some ofthe very divisions it proposes to remedy. Instead of these "separate but equal" categories, Lionnet and many of her fellow essayists prefer to invoke creolism, métissage, and especially hybridity, all of which involve cultural identities which mingle several traditions

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 1997

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