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Amnesty for All: Organizing against Criminalization in Post-Katrina New Orleans

Amnesty for All: Organizing against Criminalization in Post-Katrina New Orleans <p>Abstract:</p><p>This article traces the New Orleans Critical Resistance campaign for amnesty of "Prisons of Katrina" as a precursor to contemporary demands to "free them all." In the wake of the state&apos;s abandonment of imprisoned people at the New Orleans city jail and theracial criminalization of Katrina survivors, prison abolitionists organized for amnesty—the release of people who had been jailed and/or arrested during the storm and the complete expungement of their records—in the lineage of Black reconstruction and radical human rights. Through grassroots research, media-making, faith-based organizing, and public events, Critical Resistance documented and publicized the carceral strategies of disaster racism and demonstrated that the turn to law and order was a magnification of the everyday operations of the New Orleans punishment regime before, during, and after the storm. While they did not win amnesty for all, the campaign was vital in rebuilding the New Orleans Critical Resistance chapter and furthered abolitionist politics in city organizing.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Amnesty for All: Organizing against Criminalization in Post-Katrina New Orleans

Southern Cultures , Volume 27 (3) – Nov 6, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South
ISSN
1534-1488

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This article traces the New Orleans Critical Resistance campaign for amnesty of "Prisons of Katrina" as a precursor to contemporary demands to "free them all." In the wake of the state&apos;s abandonment of imprisoned people at the New Orleans city jail and theracial criminalization of Katrina survivors, prison abolitionists organized for amnesty—the release of people who had been jailed and/or arrested during the storm and the complete expungement of their records—in the lineage of Black reconstruction and radical human rights. Through grassroots research, media-making, faith-based organizing, and public events, Critical Resistance documented and publicized the carceral strategies of disaster racism and demonstrated that the turn to law and order was a magnification of the everyday operations of the New Orleans punishment regime before, during, and after the storm. While they did not win amnesty for all, the campaign was vital in rebuilding the New Orleans Critical Resistance chapter and furthered abolitionist politics in city organizing.</p>

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 6, 2021

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