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American Literature as World Literature ed. by Jeffrey R. Di Leo (review)

American Literature as World Literature ed. by Jeffrey R. Di Leo (review) and Serbia (Mircea A. Diaconu), Hungarian literature written in Romania (Jószef Imre Bálasz), Jewish avantgardists (Ovisiu Morar) and the relation between pro- gressivism and reactionarism in the ava ganrt-de works produced during the interwar period (Paul Cernat). Mihai Iovănel opens Part 3 with a study on Mircea Eliade, Emil Cioran and Eugène Ionesco, three writers who gained fame by exporting themselves to the world due to their ser lf- elo cation across various literary systems. Mircea Martin locates Romanian socialist realism in the “geoliterary ecumene” imposed by the political hegemony of USSR. Along the same lines, Bogdan Ştefănescu addresses the question of post- So viet Romanian history as a form of postcolonialism. Teo- dora Dumitru claims that the Romanian poets of the 1980s and Romanian post- modernism rose to prominence as a result of an intertextual dialogue with the Beat Poets. Doris Mironescu speaks about Herta Müller’s, Andrei Codrescu’s, and Norman Manea’s experience of exile whereas Mihaela Ursa discusses the impact of translation as a marker of “sociocultural po ” (3 ies23). is Attuned to the post- Co ld War paradigmatic shift in the study of the humanities, RLWL can serve as an indispensable tool for scrutinizing other eastern http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

American Literature as World Literature ed. by Jeffrey R. Di Leo (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 43 – Nov 15, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

and Serbia (Mircea A. Diaconu), Hungarian literature written in Romania (Jószef Imre Bálasz), Jewish avantgardists (Ovisiu Morar) and the relation between pro- gressivism and reactionarism in the ava ganrt-de works produced during the interwar period (Paul Cernat). Mihai Iovănel opens Part 3 with a study on Mircea Eliade, Emil Cioran and Eugène Ionesco, three writers who gained fame by exporting themselves to the world due to their ser lf- elo cation across various literary systems. Mircea Martin locates Romanian socialist realism in the “geoliterary ecumene” imposed by the political hegemony of USSR. Along the same lines, Bogdan Ştefănescu addresses the question of post- So viet Romanian history as a form of postcolonialism. Teo- dora Dumitru claims that the Romanian poets of the 1980s and Romanian post- modernism rose to prominence as a result of an intertextual dialogue with the Beat Poets. Doris Mironescu speaks about Herta Müller’s, Andrei Codrescu’s, and Norman Manea’s experience of exile whereas Mihaela Ursa discusses the impact of translation as a marker of “sociocultural po ” (3 ies23). is Attuned to the post- Co ld War paradigmatic shift in the study of the humanities, RLWL can serve as an indispensable tool for scrutinizing other eastern

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 15, 2019

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