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Academe in Chains: Habitus, Reform, and the Neoliberal University

Academe in Chains: Habitus, Reform, and the Neoliberal University Jeffrey r. Di Leo Academe in Chains Habitus, Reform, and the Neoliberal University University reform is slow--even when times are bad. In spite of the downward corporate spiral taken by most universities over the past twenty-five years, efforts to release the university from its neoliberal chains have been widely regarded as ineffective. The cost of education continues to rise as does the amount of debt incurred by students; academic freedom is now more than ever subject to the interests of capital while the curriculum faces increasing degrees of vocational recalibration and political scrutiny; and department closures, unreasonable job expectations, and job insecurity all may be linked back to a destructive form of managerialism that continues to hold sway over academe.1 What then, may we ask, is impeding university reform? What is restricting resistance to these unwanted and unpleasant aspects of academe? The answer, in short, is habitus. Specifically, academic habitus. Habitus, in its most general sense, refers to the "system of shared social dispositions and cognitive structures which generates perceptions, appreciations, and actions" (Bourdieu, Homo Academicus 279n2). This shared system of social dispositions and cognitive structures tends toward reproduction, that is, it tends toward reproducing, most importantly for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Academe in Chains: Habitus, Reform, and the Neoliberal University

The Comparatist , Volume 40 – Nov 11, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
Publisher site
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Abstract

Jeffrey r. Di Leo Academe in Chains Habitus, Reform, and the Neoliberal University University reform is slow--even when times are bad. In spite of the downward corporate spiral taken by most universities over the past twenty-five years, efforts to release the university from its neoliberal chains have been widely regarded as ineffective. The cost of education continues to rise as does the amount of debt incurred by students; academic freedom is now more than ever subject to the interests of capital while the curriculum faces increasing degrees of vocational recalibration and political scrutiny; and department closures, unreasonable job expectations, and job insecurity all may be linked back to a destructive form of managerialism that continues to hold sway over academe.1 What then, may we ask, is impeding university reform? What is restricting resistance to these unwanted and unpleasant aspects of academe? The answer, in short, is habitus. Specifically, academic habitus. Habitus, in its most general sense, refers to the "system of shared social dispositions and cognitive structures which generates perceptions, appreciations, and actions" (Bourdieu, Homo Academicus 279n2). This shared system of social dispositions and cognitive structures tends toward reproduction, that is, it tends toward reproducing, most importantly for

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 11, 2016

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