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A Return to the Black (W)hole: Mitigating the Trauma of Homelessness in Sutton E. Griggs's Imperium in Imperio

A Return to the Black (W)hole: Mitigating the Trauma of Homelessness in Sutton E. Griggs's... : Mitigating the Trauma of Homelessness in Sutton E. Griggs's Imperium in Imperio by Lynn R. Johnson The Middle Passage, this inevitable process -- drifting? -- from a lost origin to a forced destination, is an in-between space, the place of the motion from home to hell, from a lost homeland to (in)hospitable lands that must become home . . . -- Claudine Raynaud 1 The abolition of plantation slavery in 1865 heralded a period of optimism for African Americans, as they sought not only to reconnect with their estranged kin but also to establish their own homes in the vastness of America's terrain. As Carla L. Peterson conveys in Doers of the Word: African American Women Speakers and Writers in the North (1830 ­1880), antebellum black leaders trusted that the Civil War would "promise a new era in which all African Americans would finally achieve full civil rights and forge that local place which had been denied them by the historical experiences of the Middle Passage, slavery and institutional racism" (196). Yet, the persistence of racial terrorism in fin-de-siècle America impeded blacks' efforts to gain political and social agency. Despite the 1868 ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

A Return to the Black (W)hole: Mitigating the Trauma of Homelessness in Sutton E. Griggs's Imperium in Imperio

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 42 (2) – Jul 4, 2010

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
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1534-1461
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Abstract

: Mitigating the Trauma of Homelessness in Sutton E. Griggs's Imperium in Imperio by Lynn R. Johnson The Middle Passage, this inevitable process -- drifting? -- from a lost origin to a forced destination, is an in-between space, the place of the motion from home to hell, from a lost homeland to (in)hospitable lands that must become home . . . -- Claudine Raynaud 1 The abolition of plantation slavery in 1865 heralded a period of optimism for African Americans, as they sought not only to reconnect with their estranged kin but also to establish their own homes in the vastness of America's terrain. As Carla L. Peterson conveys in Doers of the Word: African American Women Speakers and Writers in the North (1830 ­1880), antebellum black leaders trusted that the Civil War would "promise a new era in which all African Americans would finally achieve full civil rights and forge that local place which had been denied them by the historical experiences of the Middle Passage, slavery and institutional racism" (196). Yet, the persistence of racial terrorism in fin-de-siècle America impeded blacks' efforts to gain political and social agency. Despite the 1868 ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment,

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 4, 2010

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