Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Lacanian Reading of No-No Boy and Obasan : Traumatic Thing and Transformation into Subjects of Jouissance

A Lacanian Reading of No-No Boy and Obasan : Traumatic Thing and Transformation into Subjects of... Fu-Jen c hen A Lacanian Reading of No-No Boy and Obasan Traumatic i Th ng and Transformation into Subjects of Jouissance Two months ae ft r the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order No. 2 910 on 18 March 492,1 “Establishing the War Relocation Authority in the Executive Oc ffi e of the President and Den fi ing its Functions and Duties.” e Th act made it legal for the United States to “relocate” Japanese American families from their homes, mainly on the West Coast, and forced them into concen- tration camps, also known as relocation camps, in Idaho, Arizona, Utah, California, Arkansas, Colorado, and Wyoming. Approximately 120,000 Japanese Americans, viewed in their homeland as “enemy aliens” or, worse, “the enemy,” lived in barracks with the barest essentials. e Th U.S. government justie fi d its action on the basis of national security. Similarly, immediately ae ft r the outbreak of World War II in the Pacic fi , Canada passed the “Order in Council PC 16” 48 and announced a policy of mass evacuation of Japanese Canadians from the coast. The Canadian govern - ment removed 23,000 persons of Japanese ancestry, 75 percent http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

A Lacanian Reading of No-No Boy and Obasan : Traumatic Thing and Transformation into Subjects of Jouissance

The Comparatist , Volume 31 – May 29, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/a-lacanian-reading-of-no-no-boy-and-obasan-traumatic-thing-and-eZGHjCRO1B
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Fu-Jen c hen A Lacanian Reading of No-No Boy and Obasan Traumatic i Th ng and Transformation into Subjects of Jouissance Two months ae ft r the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order No. 2 910 on 18 March 492,1 “Establishing the War Relocation Authority in the Executive Oc ffi e of the President and Den fi ing its Functions and Duties.” e Th act made it legal for the United States to “relocate” Japanese American families from their homes, mainly on the West Coast, and forced them into concen- tration camps, also known as relocation camps, in Idaho, Arizona, Utah, California, Arkansas, Colorado, and Wyoming. Approximately 120,000 Japanese Americans, viewed in their homeland as “enemy aliens” or, worse, “the enemy,” lived in barracks with the barest essentials. e Th U.S. government justie fi d its action on the basis of national security. Similarly, immediately ae ft r the outbreak of World War II in the Pacic fi , Canada passed the “Order in Council PC 16” 48 and announced a policy of mass evacuation of Japanese Canadians from the coast. The Canadian govern - ment removed 23,000 persons of Japanese ancestry, 75 percent

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 29, 2007

There are no references for this article.