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A Defense of Poetry: Reflections on the Occasion of Writing (review)

A Defense of Poetry: Reflections on the Occasion of Writing (review) THE COMPAKATIST Schlegel, who came after Rousseau, evidently had a certain contempt for both Cellini and Rousseau (in a passage quoted by Costa-Lima). For him tiiey represented a concentration on me selfthat was almost unwholesome. But he eventually thought of Rousseau's Confessions as a novel, quite superior to La Nouvelle Héloise. His idea of "romantic irony" is essentially opposed to system and finished theory; thus he can be considered an exponent of"criticity," like Montaigne. Costa-Lima seems to admire Schlegel's preference for the fragment. In this respect, Schlegel anticipates later critics such as Walter Benjamin. Since he was the first writer who devoted himself entirely to criticism, and he had a considerable influence in England and France as well as in Germany, he has some claim on our attention. Throughout The Limits of Voice Costa-Lima speaks of"the Law," the external structure ofbeliefs that provide die selfwith orientation. It is what gives "criticity" its meaning in that it resists the act of questioning. When he comes to Kafka in the last part of his book, Costa-Lima is dealing with a writer who is almost obsessed with power and its machinery. The Trial, The Castle, most of the shorter fictions turn http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

A Defense of Poetry: Reflections on the Occasion of Writing (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 21 (1) – Oct 3, 1997

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright © the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
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Abstract

THE COMPAKATIST Schlegel, who came after Rousseau, evidently had a certain contempt for both Cellini and Rousseau (in a passage quoted by Costa-Lima). For him tiiey represented a concentration on me selfthat was almost unwholesome. But he eventually thought of Rousseau's Confessions as a novel, quite superior to La Nouvelle Héloise. His idea of "romantic irony" is essentially opposed to system and finished theory; thus he can be considered an exponent of"criticity," like Montaigne. Costa-Lima seems to admire Schlegel's preference for the fragment. In this respect, Schlegel anticipates later critics such as Walter Benjamin. Since he was the first writer who devoted himself entirely to criticism, and he had a considerable influence in England and France as well as in Germany, he has some claim on our attention. Throughout The Limits of Voice Costa-Lima speaks of"the Law," the external structure ofbeliefs that provide die selfwith orientation. It is what gives "criticity" its meaning in that it resists the act of questioning. When he comes to Kafka in the last part of his book, Costa-Lima is dealing with a writer who is almost obsessed with power and its machinery. The Trial, The Castle, most of the shorter fictions turn

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 1997

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