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The Unexpected Role of Schooling and Bilingualism in Language Maintenance within the San Lucas Quiaviní Zapotec Community in Los Angeles

The Unexpected Role of Schooling and Bilingualism in Language Maintenance within the San Lucas... Abstract: This article analyzes language shift from San Lucas Quiaviní Zapotec to Spanish among adults in Los Angeles, California, and a subsequent language shift reversal. These patterns correlate with schooling in San Lucas. Initially, established migrants assisted Zapotec-monolingual newcomers in learning Spanish by shifting to it in the home domain. This occurred between close relatives such as spouses, parents and their children, and siblings. As Spanish education became available in San Lucas, migrants were increasingly Zapotec-Spanish bilinguals, language shift in the home relaxed, and Zapotec was again favored in adult conversation. This highlights the relevance of plurilingualism in supporting linguistic diversity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anthropological Linguistics University of Nebraska Press

The Unexpected Role of Schooling and Bilingualism in Language Maintenance within the San Lucas Quiaviní Zapotec Community in Los Angeles

Anthropological Linguistics , Volume 54 (4) – Sep 11, 2012

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1944-6527
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Abstract

Abstract: This article analyzes language shift from San Lucas Quiaviní Zapotec to Spanish among adults in Los Angeles, California, and a subsequent language shift reversal. These patterns correlate with schooling in San Lucas. Initially, established migrants assisted Zapotec-monolingual newcomers in learning Spanish by shifting to it in the home domain. This occurred between close relatives such as spouses, parents and their children, and siblings. As Spanish education became available in San Lucas, migrants were increasingly Zapotec-Spanish bilinguals, language shift in the home relaxed, and Zapotec was again favored in adult conversation. This highlights the relevance of plurilingualism in supporting linguistic diversity.

Journal

Anthropological LinguisticsUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Sep 11, 2012

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