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Subordination in Native South American Languages by Rik van Gijn, Katharina Haude, Pieter Muysken (review)

Subordination in Native South American Languages by Rik van Gijn, Katharina Haude, Pieter Muysken... ANTHROPOLOGICAL LINGUISTICS 54 NO. 2 Subordination in Native South American Languages. Edited by RIK VAN GIJN, KATHARINA HAUDE, and PIETER MUYSKEN. Typological Studies in Language 97. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2011. Pp. viii + 315. $149.00, 99.00 (hardcover). Reviewed by Kristine Stenzel, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro This volume brings together eleven studies of subordination in languages representing diverse families and three different South American regions. From the Andes, we find chapters on Ecuadorian Quechua, Tarma Quechua, Chipaya, and the now extinct Uchumataqu (these last two both belonging to the Uru-Chipaya family), while the isolates Yurakaré and Cofán, as well as Cholón (also extinct, Cholon family), come from different foothill regions. The isolate Movima, Bauré (Arawak), and Cavineña (Tacanan) are spoken in the subtropical savannahs, and lowland Amazonia is represented by Mekens (Tupí) and Mêbengokre (Jê). The editors rightly point out that although descriptive studies of South American languages have multiplied in recent years, the linguistic diversity of the region is still generally underrepresented in the theoretical and typological literature on subordination. This volume contributes to remedy in part this imbalance, focusing attention on the relations between clausal components of complex sentences­a grammatical topic that is not always http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anthropological Linguistics University of Nebraska Press

Subordination in Native South American Languages by Rik van Gijn, Katharina Haude, Pieter Muysken (review)

Anthropological Linguistics , Volume 54 (2) – Apr 7, 2012

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University of Nebraska Press
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Abstract

ANTHROPOLOGICAL LINGUISTICS 54 NO. 2 Subordination in Native South American Languages. Edited by RIK VAN GIJN, KATHARINA HAUDE, and PIETER MUYSKEN. Typological Studies in Language 97. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2011. Pp. viii + 315. $149.00, 99.00 (hardcover). Reviewed by Kristine Stenzel, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro This volume brings together eleven studies of subordination in languages representing diverse families and three different South American regions. From the Andes, we find chapters on Ecuadorian Quechua, Tarma Quechua, Chipaya, and the now extinct Uchumataqu (these last two both belonging to the Uru-Chipaya family), while the isolates Yurakaré and Cofán, as well as Cholón (also extinct, Cholon family), come from different foothill regions. The isolate Movima, Bauré (Arawak), and Cavineña (Tacanan) are spoken in the subtropical savannahs, and lowland Amazonia is represented by Mekens (Tupí) and Mêbengokre (Jê). The editors rightly point out that although descriptive studies of South American languages have multiplied in recent years, the linguistic diversity of the region is still generally underrepresented in the theoretical and typological literature on subordination. This volume contributes to remedy in part this imbalance, focusing attention on the relations between clausal components of complex sentences­a grammatical topic that is not always

Journal

Anthropological LinguisticsUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 7, 2012

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