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Reference in Discourse by Andrej A. Kibrik (review)

Reference in Discourse by Andrej A. Kibrik (review) ANTHROPOLOGICAL LINGUISTICS 54 NO. 3 How typology should handle creoles is a function of which creation story we accept. If the morphosyntax is a mildly simplified version of the substrate's, the creole should be aligned with the substrate with respect to categorial typology. But if the simplification is sharp in the early development of a creoles, going at least halfway toward a generalized creole prototype (Bickertonian or otherwise), typology will have to reserve a specific space for a "creole" profile, especially for morphological classifications. Those interested in the typology of pidgins and creoles can look forward to the 2013 publication of the Atlas of Pidgin and Creole Language Structures (APiCS) and accompanying survey volumes (Oxford University Press), which will follow the style of the familiar World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS). Aware of the preliminary results of this project (and shamelessly promoting it), Comrie's wrap-up typological chapter wisely points out that more complex syntactic phenomena, such as relative clauses, will require a more supple analytical framework, going beyond the zero-sum contest between supporters of substrate and superstrate continuity. Reference in Discourse. ANDREJ A. KIBRIK. Oxford Studies in Typology and Linguistic Theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. xxx http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anthropological Linguistics University of Nebraska Press

Reference in Discourse by Andrej A. Kibrik (review)

Anthropological Linguistics , Volume 54 (3) – Jun 14, 2012

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University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
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1944-6527
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Abstract

ANTHROPOLOGICAL LINGUISTICS 54 NO. 3 How typology should handle creoles is a function of which creation story we accept. If the morphosyntax is a mildly simplified version of the substrate's, the creole should be aligned with the substrate with respect to categorial typology. But if the simplification is sharp in the early development of a creoles, going at least halfway toward a generalized creole prototype (Bickertonian or otherwise), typology will have to reserve a specific space for a "creole" profile, especially for morphological classifications. Those interested in the typology of pidgins and creoles can look forward to the 2013 publication of the Atlas of Pidgin and Creole Language Structures (APiCS) and accompanying survey volumes (Oxford University Press), which will follow the style of the familiar World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS). Aware of the preliminary results of this project (and shamelessly promoting it), Comrie's wrap-up typological chapter wisely points out that more complex syntactic phenomena, such as relative clauses, will require a more supple analytical framework, going beyond the zero-sum contest between supporters of substrate and superstrate continuity. Reference in Discourse. ANDREJ A. KIBRIK. Oxford Studies in Typology and Linguistic Theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. xxx

Journal

Anthropological LinguisticsUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 14, 2012

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