Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Comments on a Review of Michel Launey’s An Introduction to Classical Nahuatl

Comments on a Review of Michel Launey’s An Introduction to Classical Nahuatl Comments on a Review of Michel Launey’s An Introduction to Classical Nahuatl JONATHAN D. AMITH Gettysburg College It may be unusual for a third party to comment on a book review. But Michael McCafferty’s review of Michel Launey’s An Introduction to Classical Nahuatl (2011), which recently appeared in Anthropological Linguistics (2012), is unfortunate in tone and highly problematic in content, doing a great disservice not only to the book in ques- tion but also to readers who look to reviews to guide them and to Nahuatl scholarship in general. The comments below attempt to provide a more balanced picture. The 2011 work is the English translation of an introductory grammar of Classical Nahuatl written by Michel Launey in French and published in 1979, nine years before he completed his monumental 1,609-page thèse d’état on the language (1986) but well after he had obtained the equivalent of a U.S. doctoral degree and had been teaching Nahuatl for many years. The original French book, in fact, was apparently based upon Launey’s teaching notes. These, in turn, drew on Launey’s extensive readings in early grammars (Carochi, Olmos, Aldama y Guevara) and the Classical Nahuatl corpus (particularly the Florentine Codex) (Launey p.c. 2014). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anthropological Linguistics University of Nebraska Press

Comments on a Review of Michel Launey’s An Introduction to Classical Nahuatl

Anthropological Linguistics , Volume 55 (3) – Aug 21, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/comments-on-a-review-of-michel-launey-s-an-introduction-to-classical-KPd0ZjsN1A
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1944-6527

Abstract

Comments on a Review of Michel Launey’s An Introduction to Classical Nahuatl JONATHAN D. AMITH Gettysburg College It may be unusual for a third party to comment on a book review. But Michael McCafferty’s review of Michel Launey’s An Introduction to Classical Nahuatl (2011), which recently appeared in Anthropological Linguistics (2012), is unfortunate in tone and highly problematic in content, doing a great disservice not only to the book in ques- tion but also to readers who look to reviews to guide them and to Nahuatl scholarship in general. The comments below attempt to provide a more balanced picture. The 2011 work is the English translation of an introductory grammar of Classical Nahuatl written by Michel Launey in French and published in 1979, nine years before he completed his monumental 1,609-page thèse d’état on the language (1986) but well after he had obtained the equivalent of a U.S. doctoral degree and had been teaching Nahuatl for many years. The original French book, in fact, was apparently based upon Launey’s teaching notes. These, in turn, drew on Launey’s extensive readings in early grammars (Carochi, Olmos, Aldama y Guevara) and the Classical Nahuatl corpus (particularly the Florentine Codex) (Launey p.c. 2014).

Journal

Anthropological LinguisticsUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Aug 21, 2014

There are no references for this article.