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Worship Capital: On the Political Economy of Evangelical Worship Music

Worship Capital: On the Political Economy of Evangelical Worship Music aND re W m all Worship Capital: o n the Political e conomy of e vangelical Worship m usic a t an average Sunday evening worship service at the a nchor Fellowship in Nashville, Tennessee, the worship music is as loud as a rock concert. e ven standing in the rear of the sanctuary, near the professional live sound mixing console, I can feel the speakers push the air from the front of the room. o n September 12, 2010, associate pastor David l im leads worship from the side of the stage, and for the first forty- five minutes we are united as a singing congregation, despite barely being able to hear each other. l ead pastor Joshua Stump’s sermon this evening starts with a passage about Jesus healing the apostle Peter ’s mother-in- law and others in her village, from the Gospel according to m ark (1:29–34), but he takes an apparent left turn to criticize “hipster Christians,” caricaturized by writer brett m cCracken. a fter reading m cCracken’s article in Christianity Today, Stump is uncomfortable with the idea that some churchgoers wear the Christian lifestyle like so many other disposable fashions without knowing Christ and God http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Worship Capital: On the Political Economy of Evangelical Worship Music

American Music , Volume 36 (3) – Dec 5, 2018

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

aND re W m all Worship Capital: o n the Political e conomy of e vangelical Worship m usic a t an average Sunday evening worship service at the a nchor Fellowship in Nashville, Tennessee, the worship music is as loud as a rock concert. e ven standing in the rear of the sanctuary, near the professional live sound mixing console, I can feel the speakers push the air from the front of the room. o n September 12, 2010, associate pastor David l im leads worship from the side of the stage, and for the first forty- five minutes we are united as a singing congregation, despite barely being able to hear each other. l ead pastor Joshua Stump’s sermon this evening starts with a passage about Jesus healing the apostle Peter ’s mother-in- law and others in her village, from the Gospel according to m ark (1:29–34), but he takes an apparent left turn to criticize “hipster Christians,” caricaturized by writer brett m cCracken. a fter reading m cCracken’s article in Christianity Today, Stump is uncomfortable with the idea that some churchgoers wear the Christian lifestyle like so many other disposable fashions without knowing Christ and God

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Dec 5, 2018

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