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What Will I Be: American Music and Cold War Identity by Philip M. Gentry (review)

What Will I Be: American Music and Cold War Identity by Philip M. Gentry (review) Book Reviews 527 is particularly curious, given the editors’ invocation of Charles Hiroshi Garrett, who reveals a much more complex racial and ethnic matrix of identities in the United States. (Relatedly, the volume probably should have been titled Rethinking US Music, given that none of the chapters address the music of Canada, Central, or South America.) The problems introduced by these blind spots compound other frustrating aspects of the volume. Comparing US reception of Watts to the United King - dom’s, Crookshank writes, “Perhaps it could be said that the colonies and new nation were the eager Gentile recipients of Watts’s musical gospel, in contrast to the British Israel for whom he had first poured out his efforts” (130). The com - ment, while not crucial to the argument, raises the specter of anti- Semitic ideas of ungrateful Jews rejecting Christ. More broadly, the editors classify all discus - sions of nonwhite music- making (African Americans and Browner ’s chapter on Native Americans) under the “Identity” and “Ethnography” parts. In so doing, the editors unquestioningly reproduce the white/nonwhite hierarchy that has dogged scholarship of music in the United States since its inception. Thi-s hierar chy naturalizes hegemonic whiteness so http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

What Will I Be: American Music and Cold War Identity by Philip M. Gentry (review)

American Music , Volume 38 (4) – Mar 2, 2021

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

Book Reviews 527 is particularly curious, given the editors’ invocation of Charles Hiroshi Garrett, who reveals a much more complex racial and ethnic matrix of identities in the United States. (Relatedly, the volume probably should have been titled Rethinking US Music, given that none of the chapters address the music of Canada, Central, or South America.) The problems introduced by these blind spots compound other frustrating aspects of the volume. Comparing US reception of Watts to the United King - dom’s, Crookshank writes, “Perhaps it could be said that the colonies and new nation were the eager Gentile recipients of Watts’s musical gospel, in contrast to the British Israel for whom he had first poured out his efforts” (130). The com - ment, while not crucial to the argument, raises the specter of anti- Semitic ideas of ungrateful Jews rejecting Christ. More broadly, the editors classify all discus - sions of nonwhite music- making (African Americans and Browner ’s chapter on Native Americans) under the “Identity” and “Ethnography” parts. In so doing, the editors unquestioningly reproduce the white/nonwhite hierarchy that has dogged scholarship of music in the United States since its inception. Thi-s hierar chy naturalizes hegemonic whiteness so

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 2, 2021

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