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The Ziegfeld Follies: A History in Song (review)

The Ziegfeld Follies: A History in Song (review) 128 American Music, spring 2011 The book’s substantial n fi al section collects the program and liner notes for all of Ashley’s major works, from The Fox (1957) to Ashley’s 2006 opera Concrete; a list of works (complete up to 2009) rounds out the volume. m any of the writings in this volume have been previously published, but are hard to find, having first appeared in small limited-press e uropean journals or program notes from Ashley’s live performances. Ashley’s newer contribu- tions made specifically for this volume are thoughtful and penetrating; in one particularly striking passage, he describes the new-music recital as creating an artificial museum culture while stifling any prospects of offering the specta - tor a transformational ritual experience: “it could have been juggling or a live porno act. Whatever it is, you are not a part of it. You have been a watcher. . . . You have simply been distracted from what is outside. You do not have more of a musical life. Your life is not more musical” (56). The fragments of sketches and notebooks are essential for those who wish to understand how these performances are realized, or to revive long-unperformed works. in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

The Ziegfeld Follies: A History in Song (review)

American Music , Volume 29 (1) – Sep 21, 2011

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

128 American Music, spring 2011 The book’s substantial n fi al section collects the program and liner notes for all of Ashley’s major works, from The Fox (1957) to Ashley’s 2006 opera Concrete; a list of works (complete up to 2009) rounds out the volume. m any of the writings in this volume have been previously published, but are hard to find, having first appeared in small limited-press e uropean journals or program notes from Ashley’s live performances. Ashley’s newer contribu- tions made specifically for this volume are thoughtful and penetrating; in one particularly striking passage, he describes the new-music recital as creating an artificial museum culture while stifling any prospects of offering the specta - tor a transformational ritual experience: “it could have been juggling or a live porno act. Whatever it is, you are not a part of it. You have been a watcher. . . . You have simply been distracted from what is outside. You do not have more of a musical life. Your life is not more musical” (56). The fragments of sketches and notebooks are essential for those who wish to understand how these performances are realized, or to revive long-unperformed works. in

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Sep 21, 2011

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