Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Composers’ Collective of New York, 1932–1936: Bourgeois Modernism for the Proletariat

The Composers’ Collective of New York, 1932–1936: Bourgeois Modernism for the Proletariat marIa CrISTINa Fa Va The Composers’ Collective of New York, 1932–1936: b ourgeois m odernism for the Proletariat Music penetrates everywhere It carries words with it It fixes them in the mind It graves them in the heart Music is a weapon in the class struggle. —epigraph to Workers Song book no. 1 (New York: Workers Music League, USA Section of International Music Bureau, 1934) The search for an american identity in music that characterized the years of the Great Depression coincided with a widespread demand for a music that could instill and sustain faith in a brighter future. Some composers, such as roy Harris, sought to build this new national image by finding inspiration in the mythology of the american West. others focused on a rediscovered popular appeal influenced by american folk music and hymnody, for instance, aaron Copland and Virgil Thomson. This quest for an idiosyncratic american sound was also at the basis of the activities of the Composers’ Collective of New York, a group of young artists of leftist persuasion stimulated by a desire to give music an active role in the political struggle of the day. Some of these composers are less known today, yet http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

The Composers’ Collective of New York, 1932–1936: Bourgeois Modernism for the Proletariat

American Music , Volume 34 (3) – Nov 9, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-illinois-press/the-composers-collective-of-new-york-1932-1936-bourgeois-modernism-for-9NaQhcH7dP

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

marIa CrISTINa Fa Va The Composers’ Collective of New York, 1932–1936: b ourgeois m odernism for the Proletariat Music penetrates everywhere It carries words with it It fixes them in the mind It graves them in the heart Music is a weapon in the class struggle. —epigraph to Workers Song book no. 1 (New York: Workers Music League, USA Section of International Music Bureau, 1934) The search for an american identity in music that characterized the years of the Great Depression coincided with a widespread demand for a music that could instill and sustain faith in a brighter future. Some composers, such as roy Harris, sought to build this new national image by finding inspiration in the mythology of the american West. others focused on a rediscovered popular appeal influenced by american folk music and hymnody, for instance, aaron Copland and Virgil Thomson. This quest for an idiosyncratic american sound was also at the basis of the activities of the Composers’ Collective of New York, a group of young artists of leftist persuasion stimulated by a desire to give music an active role in the political struggle of the day. Some of these composers are less known today, yet

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Nov 9, 2016

There are no references for this article.