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The Buttons on Pandora's Box: David Tudor and the Bandoneon

The Buttons on Pandora's Box: David Tudor and the Bandoneon JONATHAN GOLDMAN In the summer of 1966 the pianist David Tudor (1926­96) was preparing for the first concert in which he would appear as both instrumentalist and composer. The concert took place on October 15­16, 1966, at the 69th Regiment Armory in New York as part of the "9 Evenings: Theatre & Engineering" undertaken by Billy Klüver, an engineer working at Bell Telephone Laboratories. The events involved collaborations between artists (including many notable personalities associated with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, such as John Cage and Robert Rauschenberg) and engineers from Bell Telephone Company, in order to encourage artists to make use of Bell Telephone's battery of experimental electronic audiovisual devices. Tudor's project was a collaboration with the composer and video artist Lowell Cross, the sound artist and engineer Anthony Gnazzo, and a Bell Telephone Laboratories engineer named Fred Waldhauer. At the center of the project was the instrument Tudor had been playing for just over five years and that would continue to be a major focus of his interest throughout the 1960s: the bandoneon, the large concertina invented in mid-nineteenth-century Germany that, after migrating to the Rio de la Plata region of South America, became profoundly embedded http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

The Buttons on Pandora's Box: David Tudor and the Bandoneon

American Music , Volume 30 (1) – Oct 24, 2012

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
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1945-2349
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Abstract

JONATHAN GOLDMAN In the summer of 1966 the pianist David Tudor (1926­96) was preparing for the first concert in which he would appear as both instrumentalist and composer. The concert took place on October 15­16, 1966, at the 69th Regiment Armory in New York as part of the "9 Evenings: Theatre & Engineering" undertaken by Billy Klüver, an engineer working at Bell Telephone Laboratories. The events involved collaborations between artists (including many notable personalities associated with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, such as John Cage and Robert Rauschenberg) and engineers from Bell Telephone Company, in order to encourage artists to make use of Bell Telephone's battery of experimental electronic audiovisual devices. Tudor's project was a collaboration with the composer and video artist Lowell Cross, the sound artist and engineer Anthony Gnazzo, and a Bell Telephone Laboratories engineer named Fred Waldhauer. At the center of the project was the instrument Tudor had been playing for just over five years and that would continue to be a major focus of his interest throughout the 1960s: the bandoneon, the large concertina invented in mid-nineteenth-century Germany that, after migrating to the Rio de la Plata region of South America, became profoundly embedded

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Oct 24, 2012

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