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Showtime: A History of the Broadway Musical Theater by Larry Stempel (review)

Showtime: A History of the Broadway Musical Theater by Larry Stempel (review) Book Reviews 509 for the song that earned Kern and Fields an Academy Award). And for “On the Sunny Side of the Street,” we learn that Stephen Sondheim finds it “just perfect as a lyric” and appreciates Fields’s “colloquialism” and “effortlessness.” Lahm evidently also denied Greenspan permission to quote from Fields’s papers at the Museum of the City of New York. The author worked around this handicap by quoting from what others sent to Fields (such as notes from Dorothy Hammerstein and Mamie Eisenhower) or wrote about her (in clippings from Fields’s scrapbook). However, without primary sources from the lyricist herself—save for the 1972 recording An Evening with Dorothy Fields—Greenspan is reduced to speculating how Fields must have felt or thought. For example, after Herbert provided the book for Vincent Youmans’s Hit the Deck (1927), Greenspan supposes that “Dorothy Fields was no doubt elated at the theatrical success of her closest sibling”; and on Fields’s second marriage to Eli Lahm in 1938, Greenspan imagines, “Perhaps, for a while, [Fields] thought the changes to her life would require only minor adjustments.” Such copyright restrictions forced the author to rely on theatrical chronicles, memoirs, and biographies, including Deborah Grace Winer ’s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Showtime: A History of the Broadway Musical Theater by Larry Stempel (review)

American Music , Volume 30 (4) – Aug 4, 2013

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

Book Reviews 509 for the song that earned Kern and Fields an Academy Award). And for “On the Sunny Side of the Street,” we learn that Stephen Sondheim finds it “just perfect as a lyric” and appreciates Fields’s “colloquialism” and “effortlessness.” Lahm evidently also denied Greenspan permission to quote from Fields’s papers at the Museum of the City of New York. The author worked around this handicap by quoting from what others sent to Fields (such as notes from Dorothy Hammerstein and Mamie Eisenhower) or wrote about her (in clippings from Fields’s scrapbook). However, without primary sources from the lyricist herself—save for the 1972 recording An Evening with Dorothy Fields—Greenspan is reduced to speculating how Fields must have felt or thought. For example, after Herbert provided the book for Vincent Youmans’s Hit the Deck (1927), Greenspan supposes that “Dorothy Fields was no doubt elated at the theatrical success of her closest sibling”; and on Fields’s second marriage to Eli Lahm in 1938, Greenspan imagines, “Perhaps, for a while, [Fields] thought the changes to her life would require only minor adjustments.” Such copyright restrictions forced the author to rely on theatrical chronicles, memoirs, and biographies, including Deborah Grace Winer ’s

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Aug 4, 2013

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