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“She’s a Dear Old Lady”: English Canadian Popular Songs from World War I

“She’s a Dear Old Lady”: English Canadian Popular Songs from World War I GAYle mAGee Since 1920s, Great War has been portrayed as a defining moment in Canada's emergence from its british colonial past to an independent and unified nation on world stage. Yet recent scholarship has questioned se long-held beliefs, suggesting that unification proved more elusive than independence, for war actually sharpened rift in english-French relations. As Canadian military historian Jonathan Vance states, war "strengned two nationalisms of French and english Canada," in which "both societies gained a greater appreciation of ir separate identities from experience of war."1 dominant view through much of twentieth century, that Great War defined nation, depends on remarkable effort to create a trained military within a country that had not fought a war on its own soil for nearly a century. When britain (including Canada) declared war on August 4, 1914, country had an insubstantial army of 3,000 soldiers.2 through late summer and fall of 1914, men from most parts of country rushed to enlist: within one year 35,000 troops were fighting in europe. by 1916 more than 250,000 Canadian soldiers were training in Gayle magee (associate professor, university of illinois, urbana-Champaign) is author of three published books, most recent of which is Robert Altman's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

“She’s a Dear Old Lady”: English Canadian Popular Songs from World War I

American Music , Volume 34 (4) – Apr 15, 2016

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
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1945-2349
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Abstract

GAYle mAGee Since 1920s, Great War has been portrayed as a defining moment in Canada's emergence from its british colonial past to an independent and unified nation on world stage. Yet recent scholarship has questioned se long-held beliefs, suggesting that unification proved more elusive than independence, for war actually sharpened rift in english-French relations. As Canadian military historian Jonathan Vance states, war "strengned two nationalisms of French and english Canada," in which "both societies gained a greater appreciation of ir separate identities from experience of war."1 dominant view through much of twentieth century, that Great War defined nation, depends on remarkable effort to create a trained military within a country that had not fought a war on its own soil for nearly a century. When britain (including Canada) declared war on August 4, 1914, country had an insubstantial army of 3,000 soldiers.2 through late summer and fall of 1914, men from most parts of country rushed to enlist: within one year 35,000 troops were fighting in europe. by 1916 more than 250,000 Canadian soldiers were training in Gayle magee (associate professor, university of illinois, urbana-Champaign) is author of three published books, most recent of which is Robert Altman's

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Apr 15, 2016

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