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“She’s a Dear Old Lady”: English Canadian Popular Songs from World War I

“She’s a Dear Old Lady”: English Canadian Popular Songs from World War I GAYle mAG ee “She’s a Dear o ld l ady”: e nglish Canadian Popular Songs from World War i Since the 1920s, the Great War has been portrayed as a defining moment in Canada’s emergence from its british colonial past to an independent and unified nation on the world stage. Yet recent scholarship has ques- tioned these long- held beliefs, suggesting that unification pr oved more elusive than independence, for the war actually sharpened the rift in e nglish- French relations. As the Canadian military historian Jonathan Vance states, the war “strengthened the two nationalisms of French and e nglish Canada,” in which “both societies gained a greater appreciation of their separate identities from the experience of war.” t he dominant view through much of the twentieth century, that the Great War defined the nation, depends on the remarkable effort to create a trained military within a country that had not fought a war on its own soil for nearly a century. When b ritain (including Canada) declared war on August 4, 1914, the country had an insubstantial army of 3,000 sol- diers. t hrough the late summer and fall of 1914, men from most parts of the country http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

“She’s a Dear Old Lady”: English Canadian Popular Songs from World War I

American Music , Volume 34 (4) – Apr 15, 2017

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

GAYle mAG ee “She’s a Dear o ld l ady”: e nglish Canadian Popular Songs from World War i Since the 1920s, the Great War has been portrayed as a defining moment in Canada’s emergence from its british colonial past to an independent and unified nation on the world stage. Yet recent scholarship has ques- tioned these long- held beliefs, suggesting that unification pr oved more elusive than independence, for the war actually sharpened the rift in e nglish- French relations. As the Canadian military historian Jonathan Vance states, the war “strengthened the two nationalisms of French and e nglish Canada,” in which “both societies gained a greater appreciation of their separate identities from the experience of war.” t he dominant view through much of the twentieth century, that the Great War defined the nation, depends on the remarkable effort to create a trained military within a country that had not fought a war on its own soil for nearly a century. When b ritain (including Canada) declared war on August 4, 1914, the country had an insubstantial army of 3,000 sol- diers. t hrough the late summer and fall of 1914, men from most parts of the country

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Apr 15, 2017

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