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Scoring The Vanishing American (1925) in the American West

Scoring The Vanishing American (1925) in the American West Alli So N r obbi NS Scoring The Vanishing American (1925) in the American West o n January 28, 1926, the l ongmont Theatre in l ongmont, Colorado, featured The Vanishing American, an unusual western meant to serve as an exposé of the u .S. government’s treatment of American indians in the Southwest. At the keyboard was Della Sullivan, a skilled musician who had accompanied moving pictures for nearly twenty years in theaters from Colorado to Arizona. To aid her score for The Vanishing American, Sullivan used a commercial cue sheet compiled by James C. bradford, a New York music director who had worked primarily in broadway theaters. She did not use bradford’s cue sheet in its original form, how- ever. instead, she combined his suggestions with music she had in her personal library, a sheet music collection that reflected not only national trends in “silent” film accompaniment but also the regional music culture of the Southwest and the r ocky mountain West where she lived. As a result, her score for The Vanishing American featured music that white westerners and some prominent Native American activists considered authentic indian music in the 1920s, music that focused on the “noble http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Scoring The Vanishing American (1925) in the American West

American Music , Volume 36 (1) – Jun 15, 2018

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

Alli So N r obbi NS Scoring The Vanishing American (1925) in the American West o n January 28, 1926, the l ongmont Theatre in l ongmont, Colorado, featured The Vanishing American, an unusual western meant to serve as an exposé of the u .S. government’s treatment of American indians in the Southwest. At the keyboard was Della Sullivan, a skilled musician who had accompanied moving pictures for nearly twenty years in theaters from Colorado to Arizona. To aid her score for The Vanishing American, Sullivan used a commercial cue sheet compiled by James C. bradford, a New York music director who had worked primarily in broadway theaters. She did not use bradford’s cue sheet in its original form, how- ever. instead, she combined his suggestions with music she had in her personal library, a sheet music collection that reflected not only national trends in “silent” film accompaniment but also the regional music culture of the Southwest and the r ocky mountain West where she lived. As a result, her score for The Vanishing American featured music that white westerners and some prominent Native American activists considered authentic indian music in the 1920s, music that focused on the “noble

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jun 15, 2018

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