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Rites, Rights & Rhythms: A Genealogy of Musical Meaning in Colombia’s Black Pacific by Michael Birenbaum Quintero (review)

Rites, Rights & Rhythms: A Genealogy of Musical Meaning in Colombia’s Black Pacific by Michael... 520 American Music, Winter 2020 piece he had written in 1970 for Abraham Kaplan, who had prepared the choir for the Kaddish Symphony. Blues also figures in. For example, “I Don’t Know” from Mass borrows the riff from “Mannish Boy” by Muddy Waters. But not all of Bernstein’s jazz inspirations made the final cut. We also read that Bernstein originally planned the closing “Communion” of Mass to include a jazz- based vocal trio. “The echoes of the swing era never fully die away for Bernstein, so he still could hear jazz as a music for celebration and unity” (197). Perhaps in an effort not to sound outdated, Bernstein also tried his hand at other styles in Mass. The Celebrant’s “Simple Song,” which Baber labels as “radi - cal tonal simplicity,” reminds us of the folk- inspir ed tunes that were common at guitar masses in Catholic churches post–Vatican II, and a rock band is one of the many ensembles Bernstein calls for in his musical cornucopia. Although these attempts at keeping up with the times were not accepted by critics, Baber somewhat laments Bernstein’s inability to continue this trajectory in 1600. Part of her critique focuses on the fact http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Rites, Rights & Rhythms: A Genealogy of Musical Meaning in Colombia’s Black Pacific by Michael Birenbaum Quintero (review)

American Music , Volume 38 (4) – Mar 2, 2021

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

520 American Music, Winter 2020 piece he had written in 1970 for Abraham Kaplan, who had prepared the choir for the Kaddish Symphony. Blues also figures in. For example, “I Don’t Know” from Mass borrows the riff from “Mannish Boy” by Muddy Waters. But not all of Bernstein’s jazz inspirations made the final cut. We also read that Bernstein originally planned the closing “Communion” of Mass to include a jazz- based vocal trio. “The echoes of the swing era never fully die away for Bernstein, so he still could hear jazz as a music for celebration and unity” (197). Perhaps in an effort not to sound outdated, Bernstein also tried his hand at other styles in Mass. The Celebrant’s “Simple Song,” which Baber labels as “radi - cal tonal simplicity,” reminds us of the folk- inspir ed tunes that were common at guitar masses in Catholic churches post–Vatican II, and a rock band is one of the many ensembles Bernstein calls for in his musical cornucopia. Although these attempts at keeping up with the times were not accepted by critics, Baber somewhat laments Bernstein’s inability to continue this trajectory in 1600. Part of her critique focuses on the fact

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 2, 2021

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