Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Receiving, Remixing, Recuperating "Rebecca Black—Friday"

Receiving, Remixing, Recuperating "Rebecca Black—Friday" PAULA HARPER Receiving, Remixing, Recuperating “Rebecca Black—Friday” On March 11, 2011, popular internet humor blog D t ah ile y What published a post containing a single YouTube video. The video’s static thumbnail evoked placid suburban domesticity: a medium close-up of a white ado - lescent girl smiling widely, framed against a background of green foliage. This post, with its innocuous image—seemingly suitable for advertis - ing home insurance or back-to-school supplies—was inexplicably and provocatively captioned “Where Is Your God Now of the Day: I am no longer looking forward to the weekend.” Prior to the Daily What posting, the video had received relatively little online viewership. But just a few weeks later, on March 30, it had edged out the music video to Justin Bieber ’s “Baby” to achieve the dubious distinction of the most “disliked” video on the YouTube platform. The video in question was “Rebecca Black—Friday,” one of the most infa - mous viral videos of the early 2010s. In the video, over the course of three minutes and forty-seven seconds, singer and central g fi ure Rebecca Black narrates and moves through believably mundane situations— a schoolgirl eagerly anticipating the weekend as she completes her http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Receiving, Remixing, Recuperating "Rebecca Black—Friday"

American Music , Volume 38 (2) – Aug 28, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-illinois-press/receiving-remixing-recuperating-rebecca-black-friday-LAACNz7i95
Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

PAULA HARPER Receiving, Remixing, Recuperating “Rebecca Black—Friday” On March 11, 2011, popular internet humor blog D t ah ile y What published a post containing a single YouTube video. The video’s static thumbnail evoked placid suburban domesticity: a medium close-up of a white ado - lescent girl smiling widely, framed against a background of green foliage. This post, with its innocuous image—seemingly suitable for advertis - ing home insurance or back-to-school supplies—was inexplicably and provocatively captioned “Where Is Your God Now of the Day: I am no longer looking forward to the weekend.” Prior to the Daily What posting, the video had received relatively little online viewership. But just a few weeks later, on March 30, it had edged out the music video to Justin Bieber ’s “Baby” to achieve the dubious distinction of the most “disliked” video on the YouTube platform. The video in question was “Rebecca Black—Friday,” one of the most infa - mous viral videos of the early 2010s. In the video, over the course of three minutes and forty-seven seconds, singer and central g fi ure Rebecca Black narrates and moves through believably mundane situations— a schoolgirl eagerly anticipating the weekend as she completes her

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Aug 28, 2020

There are no references for this article.