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Ralph Shapey at the Piano: Evolution of a Style

Ralph Shapey at the Piano: Evolution of a Style GorDoN e. mArSh I remember one of the arguments with Jack Maxin. He was doing one of my pieces. I said, "Don't you see these legato lines? What are you doing? Why are you banging the shit out of the piano?" He said, "Well, isn't this twentieth-century music, conteorary music?" I said, "Yes, I guess so." He said, "Well, conteorary music is percussive." I said, "But I got legato [lines here]." "Well, a piano dsn't play legato." I said, "Yeh, but you have the illusion of it." --Ralph Shapey1 Shapey's Style and the Piano ralph Shapey's piano music spans fifty years of his creative life. iortant stages in his evolution as a cooser can be traced in much of his output for the keyboard, and the artistic significance of several of the solo works suggests that, over time, Shapey developed an iortant relationship with the instrument. An accolished violinist, Shapey gave up playing that instrument in 1946 in order to devote himself to coosition. Shapey had no real pianistic ability, but the piano served as a tool for his work, as it ds for most musicians. Perhaps, as he matured, the piano became his only hands-on contact with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Ralph Shapey at the Piano: Evolution of a Style

American Music , Volume 33 (4) – Apr 29, 2016

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349
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Abstract

GorDoN e. mArSh I remember one of the arguments with Jack Maxin. He was doing one of my pieces. I said, "Don't you see these legato lines? What are you doing? Why are you banging the shit out of the piano?" He said, "Well, isn't this twentieth-century music, conteorary music?" I said, "Yes, I guess so." He said, "Well, conteorary music is percussive." I said, "But I got legato [lines here]." "Well, a piano dsn't play legato." I said, "Yeh, but you have the illusion of it." --Ralph Shapey1 Shapey's Style and the Piano ralph Shapey's piano music spans fifty years of his creative life. iortant stages in his evolution as a cooser can be traced in much of his output for the keyboard, and the artistic significance of several of the solo works suggests that, over time, Shapey developed an iortant relationship with the instrument. An accolished violinist, Shapey gave up playing that instrument in 1946 in order to devote himself to coosition. Shapey had no real pianistic ability, but the piano served as a tool for his work, as it ds for most musicians. Perhaps, as he matured, the piano became his only hands-on contact with

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Apr 29, 2016

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