Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

New Orleans Rhythm and Blues, African American Tourism, and the Selling of a Progressive South

New Orleans Rhythm and Blues, African American Tourism, and the Selling of a Progressive South CHriST opHer CoADY New o rleans r hythm and b lues, African American Tourism, and the Selling of a progressive South in September 1950 Al monroe, an entertainment reporter for the African American–owned and –operated Chicago Defender, embarked on one of the swingingest road trips of all time. under the direction of his publica- tion’s management, monroe drove a company car south from Chicago to the city of memphis and then down farther to the city of New orleans, issuing a series of reports on the current state of southern entertainment. over the course of three months, an intriguing picture of the American South began to take shape in monroe’s dispatches. m onroe would report that New orleans’s “disc fans” were “blues crazy” and that the “town jumped” for national headliners like roy Hawkins and buddy Johnson. Saxophonist and bandleader louis Jordan “set memphis on fire,” and big Joe Turner packed in the crowds at Frank painia’s Dew Drop inn, a New orleans nightclub as “‘solid’ as old rhumboogie [the famous Chi- cago nightclub] . . . during World War ii.” Still, there was more to see in the South. Woven through monroe’s reporting on the emerging rhythm-and- blues http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

New Orleans Rhythm and Blues, African American Tourism, and the Selling of a Progressive South

American Music , Volume 37 (1) – May 7, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-illinois-press/new-orleans-rhythm-and-blues-african-american-tourism-and-the-selling-wP6PMbjcKE
Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

CHriST opHer CoADY New o rleans r hythm and b lues, African American Tourism, and the Selling of a progressive South in September 1950 Al monroe, an entertainment reporter for the African American–owned and –operated Chicago Defender, embarked on one of the swingingest road trips of all time. under the direction of his publica- tion’s management, monroe drove a company car south from Chicago to the city of memphis and then down farther to the city of New orleans, issuing a series of reports on the current state of southern entertainment. over the course of three months, an intriguing picture of the American South began to take shape in monroe’s dispatches. m onroe would report that New orleans’s “disc fans” were “blues crazy” and that the “town jumped” for national headliners like roy Hawkins and buddy Johnson. Saxophonist and bandleader louis Jordan “set memphis on fire,” and big Joe Turner packed in the crowds at Frank painia’s Dew Drop inn, a New orleans nightclub as “‘solid’ as old rhumboogie [the famous Chi- cago nightclub] . . . during World War ii.” Still, there was more to see in the South. Woven through monroe’s reporting on the emerging rhythm-and- blues

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: May 7, 2019

There are no references for this article.