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Naturalistic Fruits of the Spirit: Faith, Hope, and Love

Naturalistic Fruits of the Spirit: Faith, Hope, and Love Naturalistic Fruits of the Spirit: Faith, Hope, and Love Daniel J. Ott his article continues a dialogue between Demian Wheeler and myself that extends debates between Bernard Loomer and Bernard Meland of Tthe third generation of the Chicago school. My contribution begins with my journey from a more panentheistic approach to process theology consistent with the Claremont school toward a thoroughgoing naturalistic and empirical process theology consistent with Loomer and Meland. After clarifying why I found and find Meland’s theology more satisfying, I turn to a pragmatic analysis of the religious qualities of pantheistic and limited deity approaches to a naturalistic process theology. Finally, I offer some constructive comments regarding how a Melandian naturalistic process theology might yield religious fruits, namely, faith, hope, and love. I. The Other Process Theology They were heady times at Claremont Graduate University around the turn of the century. I had the honor of studying process theology with John Cobb, David Griffin, and Marjorie Suchocki. All of them were excellent teachers. David Griffin and his disciples were quoting Process and Reality, chapter and verse. John Cobb was recently retired, teaching a course occasionally, and more convinced than ever that process thought could change the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Theology & Philosophy University of Illinois Press

Naturalistic Fruits of the Spirit: Faith, Hope, and Love

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
2156-4795

Abstract

Naturalistic Fruits of the Spirit: Faith, Hope, and Love Daniel J. Ott his article continues a dialogue between Demian Wheeler and myself that extends debates between Bernard Loomer and Bernard Meland of Tthe third generation of the Chicago school. My contribution begins with my journey from a more panentheistic approach to process theology consistent with the Claremont school toward a thoroughgoing naturalistic and empirical process theology consistent with Loomer and Meland. After clarifying why I found and find Meland’s theology more satisfying, I turn to a pragmatic analysis of the religious qualities of pantheistic and limited deity approaches to a naturalistic process theology. Finally, I offer some constructive comments regarding how a Melandian naturalistic process theology might yield religious fruits, namely, faith, hope, and love. I. The Other Process Theology They were heady times at Claremont Graduate University around the turn of the century. I had the honor of studying process theology with John Cobb, David Griffin, and Marjorie Suchocki. All of them were excellent teachers. David Griffin and his disciples were quoting Process and Reality, chapter and verse. John Cobb was recently retired, teaching a course occasionally, and more convinced than ever that process thought could change the

Journal

American Journal of Theology & PhilosophyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Sep 16, 2021

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