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National Identity and the Oratorio in Antebellum New Orleans

National Identity and the Oratorio in Antebellum New Orleans Warre N KImball National Identity and the o ratorio in a ntebellum New o rleans In a travelogue of 1851, the touring French pianist Henri Herz remarked upon the rigid social bifurcation he observed in one of a merica’s most musically vibrant cities. “New o rleans is divided administratively into six quarters or districts,” he wrote. “In reality, however, there are only two quarters: the e nglish or a merican, and the French. They are, to all intents and purposes, two cities in one, two cities perfectly distinct from each other in every respect, from physical appearance to spirit of the inhabitants.” a lthough the notion of “two cities in one” has long framed romantic depictions of the city’s history, the influence of this duality on the musical life of New o rleans remains surprisingly forgot- ten, ignored, or misunderstood. Newly uncovered sources have begun to expose this history, however, revealing stories fraught with cultural tension and stress but also with cooperation and solidarity. Perhaps the most striking aspect of this new history is the story of how, precisely, New o rleans came to be seen as an “a merican” city: how over the course of the nineteenth century http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

National Identity and the Oratorio in Antebellum New Orleans

American Music , Volume 36 (3) – Dec 5, 2018

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

Warre N KImball National Identity and the o ratorio in a ntebellum New o rleans In a travelogue of 1851, the touring French pianist Henri Herz remarked upon the rigid social bifurcation he observed in one of a merica’s most musically vibrant cities. “New o rleans is divided administratively into six quarters or districts,” he wrote. “In reality, however, there are only two quarters: the e nglish or a merican, and the French. They are, to all intents and purposes, two cities in one, two cities perfectly distinct from each other in every respect, from physical appearance to spirit of the inhabitants.” a lthough the notion of “two cities in one” has long framed romantic depictions of the city’s history, the influence of this duality on the musical life of New o rleans remains surprisingly forgot- ten, ignored, or misunderstood. Newly uncovered sources have begun to expose this history, however, revealing stories fraught with cultural tension and stress but also with cooperation and solidarity. Perhaps the most striking aspect of this new history is the story of how, precisely, New o rleans came to be seen as an “a merican” city: how over the course of the nineteenth century

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Dec 5, 2018

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