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Justin Timberlake’s Two-Part Complementary Forms: Groove, Extension, and Maturity in Twenty-First-Century Popular Music

Justin Timberlake’s Two-Part Complementary Forms: Groove, Extension, and Maturity in... Ste PHe N Gr AHAm Justin t imberlake’s t wo- Part Complementary Forms: Groove, e xtension, and m aturity in twenty- First- Century Popular m usic t hroughout their short-lived but commer cially lucrative career, which ran principally from “i want You back” in 1996 to the third and final album, 2001’s Celebrity, Justin t imberlake’s boyband NSYNC plowed a familiar late twentieth-century pop musical furr ow. NSYNC flirted with the perceived authenticity of various black urban forms, from the balladry of groups such as boys ii men to the swinging r &b of New e dition, while sticking closely to marketable “white” imagery all the same. t his can be seen in the soft-focus, vocal- led acoustic balladry of audience- flattering songs such as “(God m ust Have Spent) A l ittle m ore t ime on You” (1998) and “t his i Promise You” (2000), as much as it can on the more urgent and driving dance pop with echoes of New Jack Swing of “t earin’ u p m y Heart” (1997), “b ye b ye b ye” (2000), and “it’s Gonna b e m e” (2000). All of this music walks a fine line between, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Justin Timberlake’s Two-Part Complementary Forms: Groove, Extension, and Maturity in Twenty-First-Century Popular Music

American Music , Volume 32 (4) – Jul 26, 2015

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

Ste PHe N Gr AHAm Justin t imberlake’s t wo- Part Complementary Forms: Groove, e xtension, and m aturity in twenty- First- Century Popular m usic t hroughout their short-lived but commer cially lucrative career, which ran principally from “i want You back” in 1996 to the third and final album, 2001’s Celebrity, Justin t imberlake’s boyband NSYNC plowed a familiar late twentieth-century pop musical furr ow. NSYNC flirted with the perceived authenticity of various black urban forms, from the balladry of groups such as boys ii men to the swinging r &b of New e dition, while sticking closely to marketable “white” imagery all the same. t his can be seen in the soft-focus, vocal- led acoustic balladry of audience- flattering songs such as “(God m ust Have Spent) A l ittle m ore t ime on You” (1998) and “t his i Promise You” (2000), as much as it can on the more urgent and driving dance pop with echoes of New Jack Swing of “t earin’ u p m y Heart” (1997), “b ye b ye b ye” (2000), and “it’s Gonna b e m e” (2000). All of this music walks a fine line between,

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jul 26, 2015

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