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Justin Timberlake’s Two-Part Complementary Forms: Groove, Extension, and Maturity in Twenty-First-Century Popular Music

Justin Timberlake’s Two-Part Complementary Forms: Groove, Extension, and Maturity in... StePHeN GrAHAm throughout their short-lived but commercially lucrative career, which ran principally from "i want You back" in 1996 to the third and final album, 2001's Celebrity, Justin timberlake's boyband NSYNC plowed a familiar late twentieth-century pop musical furrow.1 NSYNC flirted with the perceived authenticity of various black urban forms, from the balladry of groups such as boys ii men to the swinging r&b of New edition, while sticking closely to marketable "white" imagery all the same. this can be seen in the soft-focus, vocal-led acoustic balladry of audience-flattering songs such as "(God must Have Spent) A little more time on You" (1998) and "this i Promise You" (2000), as much as it can on the more urgent and driving dance pop with echoes of New Jack Swing of "tearin' up my Heart" (1997), "bye bye bye" (2000), and "it's Gonna be me" (2000).2 All of this music walks a fine line between, on the one hand, sexual danger and supposed credibility and, on the other, a carefully managed and canny "marketing of androgyny" similar to that discussed by Daryl Jamieson chiefly in relation to the backstreet boys, a group that shared early managers and an ethos with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Justin Timberlake’s Two-Part Complementary Forms: Groove, Extension, and Maturity in Twenty-First-Century Popular Music

American Music , Volume 32 (4) – Jul 26, 2014

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University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
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1945-2349
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Abstract

StePHeN GrAHAm throughout their short-lived but commercially lucrative career, which ran principally from "i want You back" in 1996 to the third and final album, 2001's Celebrity, Justin timberlake's boyband NSYNC plowed a familiar late twentieth-century pop musical furrow.1 NSYNC flirted with the perceived authenticity of various black urban forms, from the balladry of groups such as boys ii men to the swinging r&b of New edition, while sticking closely to marketable "white" imagery all the same. this can be seen in the soft-focus, vocal-led acoustic balladry of audience-flattering songs such as "(God must Have Spent) A little more time on You" (1998) and "this i Promise You" (2000), as much as it can on the more urgent and driving dance pop with echoes of New Jack Swing of "tearin' up my Heart" (1997), "bye bye bye" (2000), and "it's Gonna be me" (2000).2 All of this music walks a fine line between, on the one hand, sexual danger and supposed credibility and, on the other, a carefully managed and canny "marketing of androgyny" similar to that discussed by Daryl Jamieson chiefly in relation to the backstreet boys, a group that shared early managers and an ethos with

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jul 26, 2014

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