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Guest Editors' Introduction: Platforms, Labor, and Community in Online Listening

Guest Editors' Introduction: Platforms, Labor, and Community in Online Listening KATE GALLOWAY, K. E. GOLDSCHMITT, AND PAULA HARPER Guest Editors’ Introduction: Platforms, Labor, and Community in Online Listening As part of its 2019 global advertising campaign for “Streaming’s Big - gest Decade,” music streaming platform Spotify put up billboards and installations cleverly visualizing some of its proprietary data. One ad in the campaign used variously sized images of the viral pop singer Rebecca Black to represent the average percentage of streams of her (much-maligned) song “Friday” that occurred on each day of the week. Unsurprisingly, the largest percentage of streams of the song was cued up on the titular day; the “Friday” Black towers over the others on the billboard, leaving only her legs visible. This advertisement is almost too convenient a metonymic object for this special issue of American Music, which brings together articles and authors analyzing a variety of aspects of listening and how corporate and vernacular musical engagement takes part in twenty-first-century digital culture. The advertisement, like this issue, acknowledges the outsized presence of Spotify as a streaming industry tech behemoth. It foregrounds the prominence of user data as both tool and product and spectacularizes contemporary interactions between users and digital brands. It invokes Rebecca Black, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Guest Editors' Introduction: Platforms, Labor, and Community in Online Listening

American Music , Volume 38 (2) – Aug 28, 2020

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

KATE GALLOWAY, K. E. GOLDSCHMITT, AND PAULA HARPER Guest Editors’ Introduction: Platforms, Labor, and Community in Online Listening As part of its 2019 global advertising campaign for “Streaming’s Big - gest Decade,” music streaming platform Spotify put up billboards and installations cleverly visualizing some of its proprietary data. One ad in the campaign used variously sized images of the viral pop singer Rebecca Black to represent the average percentage of streams of her (much-maligned) song “Friday” that occurred on each day of the week. Unsurprisingly, the largest percentage of streams of the song was cued up on the titular day; the “Friday” Black towers over the others on the billboard, leaving only her legs visible. This advertisement is almost too convenient a metonymic object for this special issue of American Music, which brings together articles and authors analyzing a variety of aspects of listening and how corporate and vernacular musical engagement takes part in twenty-first-century digital culture. The advertisement, like this issue, acknowledges the outsized presence of Spotify as a streaming industry tech behemoth. It foregrounds the prominence of user data as both tool and product and spectacularizes contemporary interactions between users and digital brands. It invokes Rebecca Black,

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Aug 28, 2020

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