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Girl Scout Contrafacta and Symbolic Soldiering in the Great War

Girl Scout Contrafacta and Symbolic Soldiering in the Great War k a THer YN l a WSo N Girl Scout Contrafacta and Symbolic Soldiering in the Great War In o ctober 1917 Girl Scouts of the u Sa answered President Woodrow Wilson’s call to a merica’s children by producing a monthly magazine, the Rally. Its articles encouraged Girl Scout leaders and their troops to support the war effort by assisting the Junior r ed Cross, sewing ban- dages for soldiers, and singing Girl Scout–themed rewrites of popular songs. a mong the magazine’s many parodies, as they are also known, was an unattributed contrafactum—new words to a well-k nown tune— of “Yankee Doodle,” published in the Rally’s a ugust 1918 issue (figure 1). l ike many other songs the Rally published during World War I, this song illustrates Girl Scouts’ patriotism and wartime contributions. However, a deeper consideration of these contrafacta illuminates how Girl Scouts, their captains, and Girl Scouts of the u Sa negotiated con- temporary, competing identities of girlhood during wartime in early twentieth- century america. While scholars have traced the history of Girl Scouts and Guides in the u nited States, Canada, britain, India, and elsewhere, everyday musical practices are often noted in passing or as evidence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Girl Scout Contrafacta and Symbolic Soldiering in the Great War

American Music , Volume 35 (3) – Jan 3, 2018

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

k a THer YN l a WSo N Girl Scout Contrafacta and Symbolic Soldiering in the Great War In o ctober 1917 Girl Scouts of the u Sa answered President Woodrow Wilson’s call to a merica’s children by producing a monthly magazine, the Rally. Its articles encouraged Girl Scout leaders and their troops to support the war effort by assisting the Junior r ed Cross, sewing ban- dages for soldiers, and singing Girl Scout–themed rewrites of popular songs. a mong the magazine’s many parodies, as they are also known, was an unattributed contrafactum—new words to a well-k nown tune— of “Yankee Doodle,” published in the Rally’s a ugust 1918 issue (figure 1). l ike many other songs the Rally published during World War I, this song illustrates Girl Scouts’ patriotism and wartime contributions. However, a deeper consideration of these contrafacta illuminates how Girl Scouts, their captains, and Girl Scouts of the u Sa negotiated con- temporary, competing identities of girlhood during wartime in early twentieth- century america. While scholars have traced the history of Girl Scouts and Guides in the u nited States, Canada, britain, India, and elsewhere, everyday musical practices are often noted in passing or as evidence

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jan 3, 2018

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