Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Foster's Songs in Japan

Foster's Songs in Japan KAZUKO MIYASHITA Foster ’s Songs in Japan Since the late nineteenth century, Stephen Foster ’s songs have been among the best-known American music in Japan for his simple, famil- iar tunes, which Japanese people associate with pastoral scenery or nos- talgia for their native place or their childhood. Most Japanese students learn a number of Foster ’s songs in their music classes, from elementary through high school. Figure 1 shows several examples from music textbooks published in 2001. Japanese people also often hear his melodies on TV commercials and in many public places. Generally, their image of Foster is of a happy songwriter, but they have paid little attention to his life itself in the con- text of American history. In fact, many Japanese regard his music as part of their own cultural heritage. My first encounter with Foster ’s songs occurred in my middle school music class in the 1960s. I still remember singing songs such as “Oh, Susanna,” “Old Folks at Home,” “Old Black Joe,” “Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair,” and “My Old Kentucky Home.” I was also interested in their English lyrics, for it was at the time when Japanese children start to Kazuko Miyashita http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Foster's Songs in Japan

American Music , Volume 30 (3) – Apr 24, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-illinois-press/foster-apos-s-songs-in-japan-4pOsKz0LOy
Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

KAZUKO MIYASHITA Foster ’s Songs in Japan Since the late nineteenth century, Stephen Foster ’s songs have been among the best-known American music in Japan for his simple, famil- iar tunes, which Japanese people associate with pastoral scenery or nos- talgia for their native place or their childhood. Most Japanese students learn a number of Foster ’s songs in their music classes, from elementary through high school. Figure 1 shows several examples from music textbooks published in 2001. Japanese people also often hear his melodies on TV commercials and in many public places. Generally, their image of Foster is of a happy songwriter, but they have paid little attention to his life itself in the con- text of American history. In fact, many Japanese regard his music as part of their own cultural heritage. My first encounter with Foster ’s songs occurred in my middle school music class in the 1960s. I still remember singing songs such as “Oh, Susanna,” “Old Folks at Home,” “Old Black Joe,” “Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair,” and “My Old Kentucky Home.” I was also interested in their English lyrics, for it was at the time when Japanese children start to Kazuko Miyashita

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Apr 24, 2013

There are no references for this article.