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Eleanor Kane Neary and the Piano in Irish Traditional Music

Eleanor Kane Neary and the Piano in Irish Traditional Music CHARLES FANNING Eleanor Kane Neary and the Piano in Irish Traditional Music Irish traditional music has been thriving in the United States for many years now, with festivals, concerts, workshops, university and commu- nity courses, and an abundance of regular pub seisúns and gigs. But this was not always the case. There was an upsurge of interest in the mid- 1920s, stimulated by increased immigration from Ireland and a brief in- vestment in the music by commercial recording companies. Then came a protracted slump of thirty years, during which the recordings stopped selling and consequently stopped being made, and the music came to be seen by many, in Ireland and America both, as backward looking and decidedly uncool. This slough of despond lasted from the Depression years of the mid-1930s to the folk revival of the late 1960s. Since then, the news has been much better, with heartening, steady support for the music in America, Ireland, and elsewhere in the world. A modest bungalow at 6123 South Washtenaw on the South Side of Chicago, however, was one of the few places where the tradition was kept alive from World War II into the 1980s. This was the home of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Eleanor Kane Neary and the Piano in Irish Traditional Music

American Music , Volume 30 (4) – Aug 4, 2013

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

CHARLES FANNING Eleanor Kane Neary and the Piano in Irish Traditional Music Irish traditional music has been thriving in the United States for many years now, with festivals, concerts, workshops, university and commu- nity courses, and an abundance of regular pub seisúns and gigs. But this was not always the case. There was an upsurge of interest in the mid- 1920s, stimulated by increased immigration from Ireland and a brief in- vestment in the music by commercial recording companies. Then came a protracted slump of thirty years, during which the recordings stopped selling and consequently stopped being made, and the music came to be seen by many, in Ireland and America both, as backward looking and decidedly uncool. This slough of despond lasted from the Depression years of the mid-1930s to the folk revival of the late 1960s. Since then, the news has been much better, with heartening, steady support for the music in America, Ireland, and elsewhere in the world. A modest bungalow at 6123 South Washtenaw on the South Side of Chicago, however, was one of the few places where the tradition was kept alive from World War II into the 1980s. This was the home of

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Aug 4, 2013

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