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Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note With all that the COVID-19 pandemic has entailed, the recent months have occasioned an unusual amount of reflection on the nature of human interac - tion. When considered in light of this journal—which is nothing if not an interaction, though thankfully not of the sort that a pandemic can easily dis- rupt—the question of what it means to interact opens up some compelling lines of inquiry. Of particular interest is the relationship between interaction and tradition. As our previous issue demonstrated, traditions are in some sense patterned interactions across time. Yet how might traditions shape interactions that occur within a common moment? This is a question the present issue is well suited to address. This issue consists of two parts, each of which represents a distinct form of interaction relative to tradition. In the issue’s first part, Demian Wheeler and Daniel J. Ott interact, knowingly and reciprocally, as distinct perspectives within a specific milieu—the Chicago School—which is characterized by its unique mix of religious naturalists, naturalistic theists, and empirical process theologians. Exchanging friendly-yet-incisive commentaries on the religious qualities of naturalistic God metaphors, Wheeler and Ott are, on one level, participating in a timeless debate on how we might best http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Theology & Philosophy University of Illinois Press

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
2156-4795

Abstract

With all that the COVID-19 pandemic has entailed, the recent months have occasioned an unusual amount of reflection on the nature of human interac - tion. When considered in light of this journal—which is nothing if not an interaction, though thankfully not of the sort that a pandemic can easily dis- rupt—the question of what it means to interact opens up some compelling lines of inquiry. Of particular interest is the relationship between interaction and tradition. As our previous issue demonstrated, traditions are in some sense patterned interactions across time. Yet how might traditions shape interactions that occur within a common moment? This is a question the present issue is well suited to address. This issue consists of two parts, each of which represents a distinct form of interaction relative to tradition. In the issue’s first part, Demian Wheeler and Daniel J. Ott interact, knowingly and reciprocally, as distinct perspectives within a specific milieu—the Chicago School—which is characterized by its unique mix of religious naturalists, naturalistic theists, and empirical process theologians. Exchanging friendly-yet-incisive commentaries on the religious qualities of naturalistic God metaphors, Wheeler and Ott are, on one level, participating in a timeless debate on how we might best

Journal

American Journal of Theology & PhilosophyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Sep 16, 2021

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