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Editor's Introduction: Special Issue on Silent Film Music

Editor's Introduction: Special Issue on Silent Film Music gAY le mA gee e ditor ’s introduction: Special issue on Silent Film m usic This issue presents four distinct perspectives on music and early film through the mid- 1920s, a few years before the advent of synchronized sound revolutionized the industry. While this period is often referred to as the silent era, these films were never truly silent, as has often been noted. As the four authors in this issue abundantly illustrate, the music that accompanied silent film viewings served a multitude of cinematic and sonic purposes within a shifting musical, social, and cultural landscape. e rin m . b rooks’s article considers the meaning of silent film exhibition in the 1910s within the comparatively new o rchestra Hall in Chicago and Symphony Hall in b oston, as well as the more established venue of the m etropolitan o pera in New York. These spaces were devoted to elite e uropean concert music and opera at a historical moment in the effort to distinguish such elevated art from popular entertainment. Yet, as b rooks demonstrates, the presentation of silent films within these spaces blurred these boundaries and those of live and filmed performance, drawing on conventions associated with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Editor's Introduction: Special Issue on Silent Film Music

American Music , Volume 36 (1) – Jun 15, 2018

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

gAY le mA gee e ditor ’s introduction: Special issue on Silent Film m usic This issue presents four distinct perspectives on music and early film through the mid- 1920s, a few years before the advent of synchronized sound revolutionized the industry. While this period is often referred to as the silent era, these films were never truly silent, as has often been noted. As the four authors in this issue abundantly illustrate, the music that accompanied silent film viewings served a multitude of cinematic and sonic purposes within a shifting musical, social, and cultural landscape. e rin m . b rooks’s article considers the meaning of silent film exhibition in the 1910s within the comparatively new o rchestra Hall in Chicago and Symphony Hall in b oston, as well as the more established venue of the m etropolitan o pera in New York. These spaces were devoted to elite e uropean concert music and opera at a historical moment in the effort to distinguish such elevated art from popular entertainment. Yet, as b rooks demonstrates, the presentation of silent films within these spaces blurred these boundaries and those of live and filmed performance, drawing on conventions associated with

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jun 15, 2018

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