Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Decoding Harry Partch’s Aesthetic: Satire, Duality, and Water! Water!

Decoding Harry Partch’s Aesthetic: Satire, Duality, and Water! Water! Andrew Granade Decoding Harry Partch’s Aesthetic: Satire, Duality, and Water! Water! In the spring of 1961, the Student Activities Board of the Illini Student Union was casting about for a new show. Each year, the Union sponsored a student production of a musical, and while 1961’s show had been a success, they wanted the 1962 performance to turn heads. John Garvey, the group’s faculty advisor, had just finished conducting a successful University of Illinois production of Harry Partch’s Revelation in the Courthouse Park.1 Engaging Partch, perhaps best known for using just intonation to divide the octave into forty-three pitches and then building instruments to play in that scale, certainly guaranteed that the show would turn heads. As Roger Ebert (then a student at the U of I) noted in his review for the Daily Illini, “It was an evening with the offbeat mind of Harry Partch. Perhaps, after all, that is really explanation enough.”2 The show in question, Water! Water!, remains a curio in Partch’s output, comparable to Benjamin Britten’s Paul Bunyan and Aaron Copland’s The Second Hurricane for its place in the composer’s oeuvre as a piece for student productions. Partch seldom mentioned or wrote about the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Decoding Harry Partch’s Aesthetic: Satire, Duality, and Water! Water!

American Music , Volume 35 (2) – Aug 30, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-illinois-press/decoding-harry-partch-s-aesthetic-satire-duality-and-water-water-VlQ75sdYP0
Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Andrew Granade Decoding Harry Partch’s Aesthetic: Satire, Duality, and Water! Water! In the spring of 1961, the Student Activities Board of the Illini Student Union was casting about for a new show. Each year, the Union sponsored a student production of a musical, and while 1961’s show had been a success, they wanted the 1962 performance to turn heads. John Garvey, the group’s faculty advisor, had just finished conducting a successful University of Illinois production of Harry Partch’s Revelation in the Courthouse Park.1 Engaging Partch, perhaps best known for using just intonation to divide the octave into forty-three pitches and then building instruments to play in that scale, certainly guaranteed that the show would turn heads. As Roger Ebert (then a student at the U of I) noted in his review for the Daily Illini, “It was an evening with the offbeat mind of Harry Partch. Perhaps, after all, that is really explanation enough.”2 The show in question, Water! Water!, remains a curio in Partch’s output, comparable to Benjamin Britten’s Paul Bunyan and Aaron Copland’s The Second Hurricane for its place in the composer’s oeuvre as a piece for student productions. Partch seldom mentioned or wrote about the

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Aug 30, 2017

There are no references for this article.