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Country Radio's Growing Pains in the Music Trades, 1967–1977

Country Radio's Growing Pains in the Music Trades, 1967–1977 HIs Tor Ians’ Corner KIm sImpson Country r adio’s Growing pains in the m usic Trades, 1967–1977 The late sixties and early seventies were a watershed in radio history. seemingly countless new “formats”—each comprising a radio station’s characteristic musical selections—were suddenly available. In the words of one historian, formats proliferated “like cereal brands on the grocery shelf.” Why? a mong the primary reasons were the surge in popularity of Fm stations and the industry’s increased reliance on audience measure- ment surveys and consultants, which led to more narrowly den fi ed niche market segmentation. Country music formats, especially, came into their own during this era, gathering so much momentum that, according to a 1977 study by the radio research r fi m mcGavren-Guild, the market share of country stations had gone up by 52.3 percent in only five years. This boom in their business made it necessary for more than a few early seventies country stations to hire new disc jockeys with experience in Top 40 programming—even if they had no genuine background or interest in country—and add them to their roster of veteran country DJs. pho- tographs like one in a 1971 Music City News advertisement promoting Florida http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Country Radio's Growing Pains in the Music Trades, 1967–1977

American Music , Volume 27 (4) – Feb 26, 2010

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

HIs Tor Ians’ Corner KIm sImpson Country r adio’s Growing pains in the m usic Trades, 1967–1977 The late sixties and early seventies were a watershed in radio history. seemingly countless new “formats”—each comprising a radio station’s characteristic musical selections—were suddenly available. In the words of one historian, formats proliferated “like cereal brands on the grocery shelf.” Why? a mong the primary reasons were the surge in popularity of Fm stations and the industry’s increased reliance on audience measure- ment surveys and consultants, which led to more narrowly den fi ed niche market segmentation. Country music formats, especially, came into their own during this era, gathering so much momentum that, according to a 1977 study by the radio research r fi m mcGavren-Guild, the market share of country stations had gone up by 52.3 percent in only five years. This boom in their business made it necessary for more than a few early seventies country stations to hire new disc jockeys with experience in Top 40 programming—even if they had no genuine background or interest in country—and add them to their roster of veteran country DJs. pho- tographs like one in a 1971 Music City News advertisement promoting Florida

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 26, 2010

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