Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Clamor of the Godz: Radical Incompetence in 1960s Rock

Clamor of the Godz: Radical Incompetence in 1960s Rock pATriCk burke Clamor of the g odz: r adical incompetence in 1960s r ock Just about everyone is a musician. most scholars of music find this view fairly uncontroversial. We often define music as “humanly organized sound” or something similar, and allow a wide range of human behav- iors into its purview. if one sings in the shower, one makes music. if someone taps his or her fingers rhythmically while waiting for a bus, he or she makes music. As the well-known example of percussionist evelyn glennie indicates, profoundly deaf people can comprehend and perform complex music, and recent scholarship demonstrates the signifi - cant musical capabilities of those whose disabilities, such as blindness or Asperger ’s syndrome, lead others to stigmatize them as abnormal. other than “amusical” people, such as those described by oliver sacks, whose neurological makeup renders them unable to perceive or make music, every person appears to be a musician. Not everyone, however, accepts this broad den fi ition of musicianship. e thnomusicologists have reported, certainly, on societies that seem to regard everyone as more or less equally musical. Thomas Turino points out that “some societies do not even have the concept of innate musical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Clamor of the Godz: Radical Incompetence in 1960s Rock

American Music , Volume 29 (1) – Sep 21, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-illinois-press/clamor-of-the-godz-radical-incompetence-in-1960s-rock-WAD3enBLbN
Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

pATriCk burke Clamor of the g odz: r adical incompetence in 1960s r ock Just about everyone is a musician. most scholars of music find this view fairly uncontroversial. We often define music as “humanly organized sound” or something similar, and allow a wide range of human behav- iors into its purview. if one sings in the shower, one makes music. if someone taps his or her fingers rhythmically while waiting for a bus, he or she makes music. As the well-known example of percussionist evelyn glennie indicates, profoundly deaf people can comprehend and perform complex music, and recent scholarship demonstrates the signifi - cant musical capabilities of those whose disabilities, such as blindness or Asperger ’s syndrome, lead others to stigmatize them as abnormal. other than “amusical” people, such as those described by oliver sacks, whose neurological makeup renders them unable to perceive or make music, every person appears to be a musician. Not everyone, however, accepts this broad den fi ition of musicianship. e thnomusicologists have reported, certainly, on societies that seem to regard everyone as more or less equally musical. Thomas Turino points out that “some societies do not even have the concept of innate musical

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Sep 21, 2011

There are no references for this article.