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Chaplin and the Sandblaster: Edmund Wilson’s Avant-Garde Noise Abatement

Chaplin and the Sandblaster: Edmund Wilson’s Avant-Garde Noise Abatement ScoTT D. PaUlIn "I have written a great super-ballet of new York," announced Edmund Wilson in a letter of January 1924, referring to a project tentatively to be produced by the Ballets Suédois--and a project that was conceived, to a surprising degree, in terms of sonic spectacle. Wilson's breathless description becomes nearly deafening at its climax, revealing that his ballet would be: a pantomime explained by movie captions and with a section of movie film in the middle, for which [leo] ornstein is composing the music and in which we hope to get chaplin to act. It is positively the most titanic thing of the kind ever projected and will make the productions of Milhaud and cocteau sound like folk-song recitals. It is written for chaplin, a negro comedian, and seventeen other characters, full orchestra, movie machine, typewriters, radio, phonograph, riveter, electromagnet, alarm clocks, telephone bells, and jazz band. They may send me out to the coast in a few days to try to persuade chaplin to take part in it. If it comes off--though it will probably start in america--they will later take it to Paris.1 anyone who has even so much as dabbled in the 1920s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Chaplin and the Sandblaster: Edmund Wilson’s Avant-Garde Noise Abatement

American Music , Volume 28 (3) – Aug 20, 2010

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University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
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1945-2349
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Abstract

ScoTT D. PaUlIn "I have written a great super-ballet of new York," announced Edmund Wilson in a letter of January 1924, referring to a project tentatively to be produced by the Ballets Suédois--and a project that was conceived, to a surprising degree, in terms of sonic spectacle. Wilson's breathless description becomes nearly deafening at its climax, revealing that his ballet would be: a pantomime explained by movie captions and with a section of movie film in the middle, for which [leo] ornstein is composing the music and in which we hope to get chaplin to act. It is positively the most titanic thing of the kind ever projected and will make the productions of Milhaud and cocteau sound like folk-song recitals. It is written for chaplin, a negro comedian, and seventeen other characters, full orchestra, movie machine, typewriters, radio, phonograph, riveter, electromagnet, alarm clocks, telephone bells, and jazz band. They may send me out to the coast in a few days to try to persuade chaplin to take part in it. If it comes off--though it will probably start in america--they will later take it to Paris.1 anyone who has even so much as dabbled in the 1920s

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Aug 20, 2010

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