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Beyond the Crossroads: The Devil and the Blues Tradition by Adam Gussow (review)

Beyond the Crossroads: The Devil and the Blues Tradition by Adam Gussow (review) reviews 119 regional cultural primer, and highly thoughtful regional presentation all in one highly attractive package. Arguably more so than on any other of her releases, rhiannon giddens expresses an incredible sampling of her own musical and personal pathways on this record, and it is a noteworthy and welcome contribu- tion to the continuing discourse on defining what traditional music in the united States might be defined as by the general public and what it might aspire to be through the voices of its musicians. mark Y. miyake Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies, Western Washington University NoTeS 1. Thomas richardson, review of Carolina Chocolate Drops and Joe Thompson by rhiannon giddens, Justin robinson, Dom Flemons, Sule greg Wilson, and bob Carlin and American Songster by Dom Flemons, Ethnomusicology 54, no. 3 (2010): 537–40. 2. Samuel Tyndale Wilson, The Southern Mountaineers (New York: presbyterian Home missions, 1906), 11. 3. William H. Turner, “The Demography of black Appalachia: past and present,” in Blacks in Appalachia, ed. William H. Turner and edward J. Cabbell (lexington: university press of Kentucky, 1985), 238. 4. ronald l. lewis, “From peasant to proletarian: The migration of Southern blacks to the Central Appalachian Coalfields,” Journal of Southern http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Beyond the Crossroads: The Devil and the Blues Tradition by Adam Gussow (review)

American Music , Volume 37 (1) – May 7, 2019

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

reviews 119 regional cultural primer, and highly thoughtful regional presentation all in one highly attractive package. Arguably more so than on any other of her releases, rhiannon giddens expresses an incredible sampling of her own musical and personal pathways on this record, and it is a noteworthy and welcome contribu- tion to the continuing discourse on defining what traditional music in the united States might be defined as by the general public and what it might aspire to be through the voices of its musicians. mark Y. miyake Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies, Western Washington University NoTeS 1. Thomas richardson, review of Carolina Chocolate Drops and Joe Thompson by rhiannon giddens, Justin robinson, Dom Flemons, Sule greg Wilson, and bob Carlin and American Songster by Dom Flemons, Ethnomusicology 54, no. 3 (2010): 537–40. 2. Samuel Tyndale Wilson, The Southern Mountaineers (New York: presbyterian Home missions, 1906), 11. 3. William H. Turner, “The Demography of black Appalachia: past and present,” in Blacks in Appalachia, ed. William H. Turner and edward J. Cabbell (lexington: university press of Kentucky, 1985), 238. 4. ronald l. lewis, “From peasant to proletarian: The migration of Southern blacks to the Central Appalachian Coalfields,” Journal of Southern

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: May 7, 2019

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