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Anthems and Minstrel Shows: The Life and Times of Calixa Lavallée, 1842–1891 by Brian Christopher Thompson (review)

Anthems and Minstrel Shows: The Life and Times of Calixa Lavallée, 1842–1891 by Brian... 404 American Music, Fall 2016 anti-Semitic comments made by Ives’s composer friend and contemporary Carl ruggles, budiansky downplays Ives’s use of the phrases “Jew York” and “materialistic-minded Jew students” (224) as less serious because many of Ives’s musical friends were, in fact, Jewish. likewise, budiansky attempts to excuse Ives’s common practice of calling musicians and audience members he didn’t like “sissies” and “pansies,” as well as his frequent use of the term “emasculated music,” because Ives had several gay acquaintances (225). also problematic is budiansky’s frequent need to comment on the appearances of both Ives’s wife, Harmony, and his adopted daughter, e dith. He explains that Harmony “was predictably described as ‘beautiful,’ but portrait photographs of her at age twenty and twenty-two do not bear this out” (134–35) and describes edith as an “extraordinarily pretty young woman” (197) and again later as “a viva- cious and very pretty young woman” (236). Nowhere does budiansky offer such opinions on the appearances of the men in Ives’s life. Despite these issues, Mad Music offers an engaging reexamination of the life of Charles Ives. The wealth of new information will surely stimulate Ives specialists, and budiansky’s clear and entertaining prose will be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Music University of Illinois Press

Anthems and Minstrel Shows: The Life and Times of Calixa Lavallée, 1842–1891 by Brian Christopher Thompson (review)

American Music , Volume 34 (3) – Nov 9, 2016

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-2349

Abstract

404 American Music, Fall 2016 anti-Semitic comments made by Ives’s composer friend and contemporary Carl ruggles, budiansky downplays Ives’s use of the phrases “Jew York” and “materialistic-minded Jew students” (224) as less serious because many of Ives’s musical friends were, in fact, Jewish. likewise, budiansky attempts to excuse Ives’s common practice of calling musicians and audience members he didn’t like “sissies” and “pansies,” as well as his frequent use of the term “emasculated music,” because Ives had several gay acquaintances (225). also problematic is budiansky’s frequent need to comment on the appearances of both Ives’s wife, Harmony, and his adopted daughter, e dith. He explains that Harmony “was predictably described as ‘beautiful,’ but portrait photographs of her at age twenty and twenty-two do not bear this out” (134–35) and describes edith as an “extraordinarily pretty young woman” (197) and again later as “a viva- cious and very pretty young woman” (236). Nowhere does budiansky offer such opinions on the appearances of the men in Ives’s life. Despite these issues, Mad Music offers an engaging reexamination of the life of Charles Ives. The wealth of new information will surely stimulate Ives specialists, and budiansky’s clear and entertaining prose will be

Journal

American MusicUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Nov 9, 2016

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