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Sigatoka: The Shifting Sands of Fijian Prehistory (review)

Sigatoka: The Shifting Sands of Fijian Prehistory (review) book reviews 303 AmyGreenwell Garden, extensive archi- term production in a variable environment tectural projects maybe built for purposes (as a bet-hedging strategy). Allen concludes of risk management. She goes on to reason that strategies with stabilizing e¤ects buf- that risk management projects maybe- fered the Kona system against perturba- come part of the intensification strategy tions, and that risk management became a (pp. 148–150). successful means of intensification. It was Allen assesses the results of the archaeo- onlywhen the area became more popu- logical research at the AmyGreenwell lous, or chieflycompetition demanded Garden, and uses empirical data to examine increased production, that intensification the process of intensification and its ar- without risk management developed (p. chaeological identification. She argues that 152). risk management strategies, usuallyeclipsed Allen advances a reasonable model to bya focus on the short-term benefits of in- explain the agronomic strategies behind the tensification, are strategies providing long- system uncovered through her and others’ term benefits. Allen bases her argument on archaeological e¤orts, and she has antici- the archaeological evidence of kauiwi con- pated, and countered, criticism of her struction, and on the timing of their con- model bypresenting a chronological se- struction. quence that shows http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Sigatoka: The Shifting Sands of Fijian Prehistory (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 41 (2) – Feb 14, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283

Abstract

book reviews 303 AmyGreenwell Garden, extensive archi- term production in a variable environment tectural projects maybe built for purposes (as a bet-hedging strategy). Allen concludes of risk management. She goes on to reason that strategies with stabilizing e¤ects buf- that risk management projects maybe- fered the Kona system against perturba- come part of the intensification strategy tions, and that risk management became a (pp. 148–150). successful means of intensification. It was Allen assesses the results of the archaeo- onlywhen the area became more popu- logical research at the AmyGreenwell lous, or chieflycompetition demanded Garden, and uses empirical data to examine increased production, that intensification the process of intensification and its ar- without risk management developed (p. chaeological identification. She argues that 152). risk management strategies, usuallyeclipsed Allen advances a reasonable model to bya focus on the short-term benefits of in- explain the agronomic strategies behind the tensification, are strategies providing long- system uncovered through her and others’ term benefits. Allen bases her argument on archaeological e¤orts, and she has antici- the archaeological evidence of kauiwi con- pated, and countered, criticism of her struction, and on the timing of their con- model bypresenting a chronological se- struction. quence that shows

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 14, 2003

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