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New Radiocarbon Ages of Colonization Sites in East Polynesia

New Radiocarbon Ages of Colonization Sites in East Polynesia <p>The archaeological chronology of initial human colonization in East Polynesia has relied substantially upon radiocarbon dating results from a small number of sites in the central region, notably Motu Paeao cemetery (Maupiti) and Vaito&apos;otia-Fa&apos;ahia (Huahine) in the Society Islands, and Hane (Ua Huka) and Ha&apos;atuatua (Nuku Hiva) in the Marquesas Islands. Recent field research and new radiocarbon dates showed that Ha&apos;atuatua and Motu Paeao were occupied significantly later than had been suggested by earlier results. We now report the results of new radiocarbon dating on the remaining two sites. Leaving aside questionable results on bone and wood samples, six shell samples from Vaito&apos;otia-Fa&apos;ahia indicate occupation in the period a.d. 1050&#8211;1450. Five shell and five charcoal samples from Hane indicate that occupation did not begin earlier than about a.d. 1000. Taken together with other recent research on the chronology of initial colonization in East Polynesia we suggest that habitation did not begin until a.d. 900 or later.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

New Radiocarbon Ages of Colonization Sites in East Polynesia

Asian Perspectives , Volume 41 (2) – Feb 14, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283

Abstract

<p>The archaeological chronology of initial human colonization in East Polynesia has relied substantially upon radiocarbon dating results from a small number of sites in the central region, notably Motu Paeao cemetery (Maupiti) and Vaito&apos;otia-Fa&apos;ahia (Huahine) in the Society Islands, and Hane (Ua Huka) and Ha&apos;atuatua (Nuku Hiva) in the Marquesas Islands. Recent field research and new radiocarbon dates showed that Ha&apos;atuatua and Motu Paeao were occupied significantly later than had been suggested by earlier results. We now report the results of new radiocarbon dating on the remaining two sites. Leaving aside questionable results on bone and wood samples, six shell samples from Vaito&apos;otia-Fa&apos;ahia indicate occupation in the period a.d. 1050&#8211;1450. Five shell and five charcoal samples from Hane indicate that occupation did not begin earlier than about a.d. 1000. Taken together with other recent research on the chronology of initial colonization in East Polynesia we suggest that habitation did not begin until a.d. 900 or later.</p>

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 14, 2003

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