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“We’re Here to Help”: Criminal Justice Collaboration among Social Service Providers across the Urban-Rural Continuum

“We’re Here to Help”: Criminal Justice Collaboration among Social Service Providers across the... Recent social movements have called for an end to mass incarceration and the diversion of funds from police and carceral institutions to social services. However, such a restructuring is limited without addressing the commonplace collaborations between criminal justice actors and social service practitioners. In an interview study with 66 social service providers who offer services to formerly incarcerated people, we examine practitioners’ relationships with the criminal justice system. Participants overwhelmingly report a reliance on direct collaboration with the criminal justice system to address a multiplicity of barriers people face when returning home to cities with weak social and economic infrastructures. Participants also described a moral frame situating themselves as mediators amid tensions between community members and the criminal justice system. Social service providers’ deep financial, logistical, and ideological entrenchment across the criminal justice system has several implications for the afterlife of mass incarceration and the capacity to reimagine justice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Service Review University of Chicago Press

“We’re Here to Help”: Criminal Justice Collaboration among Social Service Providers across the Urban-Rural Continuum

Social Service Review , Volume 96 (2): 40 – Jun 1, 2022

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Publisher
University of Chicago Press
Copyright
© 2022 The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0037-7961
eISSN
1537-5404
DOI
10.1086/719901
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent social movements have called for an end to mass incarceration and the diversion of funds from police and carceral institutions to social services. However, such a restructuring is limited without addressing the commonplace collaborations between criminal justice actors and social service practitioners. In an interview study with 66 social service providers who offer services to formerly incarcerated people, we examine practitioners’ relationships with the criminal justice system. Participants overwhelmingly report a reliance on direct collaboration with the criminal justice system to address a multiplicity of barriers people face when returning home to cities with weak social and economic infrastructures. Participants also described a moral frame situating themselves as mediators amid tensions between community members and the criminal justice system. Social service providers’ deep financial, logistical, and ideological entrenchment across the criminal justice system has several implications for the afterlife of mass incarceration and the capacity to reimagine justice.

Journal

Social Service ReviewUniversity of Chicago Press

Published: Jun 1, 2022

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