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The Afterlife of Mass Incarceration, or What Does It Mean to Need a “Brute” in the Twenty-First Century?

The Afterlife of Mass Incarceration, or What Does It Mean to Need a “Brute” in the Twenty-First... We live in troubling times. As I write this article, the Russian Federation has invaded Ukraine, bringing the horrors of war, once again, to continental Europe. The world cheers Ukrainian resistance, and surrounding nations have opened their borders to receive the millions of refugees forced by terror to flee their homes. But in a reminder that we live in a world that fears and criminalizes the “other,” holding them in disdain, African and Arab refugees have been plucked from trains and buses in their attempts to escape. They have been refused shelter in homes that welcomed their neighbors and made to know, in myriad ways, that they do not belong.1 This is unsurprising when considering the many moral panics about the danger of the foreign-born other. Refugees are often blamed for crime waves in the countries that receive them, despite there being little to no evidence of an actual spike in crime.2 Recent statements from the prime minister of Bulgaria explained the difference in treatment. “These are not the refugees we are used to,” he said. “These people are Europeans” (Brito 2022).The disdain for African and Arab people escaping violence on a similar scale is perhaps best captured in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Service Review University of Chicago Press

The Afterlife of Mass Incarceration, or What Does It Mean to Need a “Brute” in the Twenty-First Century?

Social Service Review , Volume 96 (2): 6 – Jun 1, 2022

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Publisher
University of Chicago Press
Copyright
© 2022 The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0037-7961
eISSN
1537-5404
DOI
10.1086/720275
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We live in troubling times. As I write this article, the Russian Federation has invaded Ukraine, bringing the horrors of war, once again, to continental Europe. The world cheers Ukrainian resistance, and surrounding nations have opened their borders to receive the millions of refugees forced by terror to flee their homes. But in a reminder that we live in a world that fears and criminalizes the “other,” holding them in disdain, African and Arab refugees have been plucked from trains and buses in their attempts to escape. They have been refused shelter in homes that welcomed their neighbors and made to know, in myriad ways, that they do not belong.1 This is unsurprising when considering the many moral panics about the danger of the foreign-born other. Refugees are often blamed for crime waves in the countries that receive them, despite there being little to no evidence of an actual spike in crime.2 Recent statements from the prime minister of Bulgaria explained the difference in treatment. “These are not the refugees we are used to,” he said. “These people are Europeans” (Brito 2022).The disdain for African and Arab people escaping violence on a similar scale is perhaps best captured in

Journal

Social Service ReviewUniversity of Chicago Press

Published: Jun 1, 2022

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