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"To Tear the Fetter of Every Other Art": Early Romantic Criticism and the Fantasy of Emancipation

"To Tear the Fetter of Every Other Art": Early Romantic Criticism and the Fantasy of Emancipation LISA FISHMA Early Romanti Criticism “To Tear the Fetter of Every Other Art”: Early Romantic Criticism and the Fantasy of Emancipation LISA FISHMAN Aesthetic conceptions of music experienced a dramatic upheaval during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Time-honored views of music’s subservience to words, and the concomitant ranking of the literary arts above music and vocal music above instrumental, were turned on their heads. Together with the changes in musical institutions and modes of reception, these upheavals have been well charted, their intricacies documented in several major studies.1 Two texts appearing in 1806 are intriguing symptoms of the prevalent anxiety over words and music and offer a new angle on the issues at stake in the aesthetic debate. Belgian theorist Jérôme-Joseph de Momigny and German critic August Apel added text to instrumental compositions by Mozart, the rst movements of the D-Minor String Quartet, K. 421, and E -Major Symphony, K. 543, respectively. 2 In so doing, Momigny hoped to clarify See Bellamy Hosler, Changing Aesthetic Views of Instrumental Music in 18-Century Germany (Ann Arbor, 1981); and John Neubauer, The Emancipation of Music from Language: Departure from Mimesis in Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics (New Haven, 1986). On the relationship http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png 19th-Century Music University of California Press

"To Tear the Fetter of Every Other Art": Early Romantic Criticism and the Fantasy of Emancipation

19th-Century Music , Volume 25 (1) – Jul 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
Copyright © by the University of California Press
Subject
Research Article
ISSN
0148-2076
eISSN
1533-8606
DOI
10.1525/ncm.2001.25.1.75
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LISA FISHMA Early Romanti Criticism “To Tear the Fetter of Every Other Art”: Early Romantic Criticism and the Fantasy of Emancipation LISA FISHMAN Aesthetic conceptions of music experienced a dramatic upheaval during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Time-honored views of music’s subservience to words, and the concomitant ranking of the literary arts above music and vocal music above instrumental, were turned on their heads. Together with the changes in musical institutions and modes of reception, these upheavals have been well charted, their intricacies documented in several major studies.1 Two texts appearing in 1806 are intriguing symptoms of the prevalent anxiety over words and music and offer a new angle on the issues at stake in the aesthetic debate. Belgian theorist Jérôme-Joseph de Momigny and German critic August Apel added text to instrumental compositions by Mozart, the rst movements of the D-Minor String Quartet, K. 421, and E -Major Symphony, K. 543, respectively. 2 In so doing, Momigny hoped to clarify See Bellamy Hosler, Changing Aesthetic Views of Instrumental Music in 18-Century Germany (Ann Arbor, 1981); and John Neubauer, The Emancipation of Music from Language: Departure from Mimesis in Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics (New Haven, 1986). On the relationship

Journal

19th-Century MusicUniversity of California Press

Published: Jul 1, 2001

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