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The Historian’s Eye

The Historian’s Eye Squatters camped out in a Hoover Town during the Depression. Security Pacific National Bank Collection, Los Angeles Public Library, 00041968. Southern California Quarterly, Vol. 101, No. 4, pp. 462–463. ISSN 0038-3929, eISSN 2162-8637. © 2019 by The Historical Society of Southern California. All rights reserved. Request permission to photocopy or reproduce article content at the University of California Press’s Reprints and Permissions web page, https://www.ucpress.edu/journals/reprints-permissions. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1525/scq.2019.101.4.462. 462 THE HISTORIAN’S EYE n the early years of the Great Depression, the Los Angeles Times reported that thousands of unemployed “moochers,” vagabonds,” I and “able-bodied beggars,” were flocking to Los Angeles, attracted by the sunny climate and rumors of jobs available on the Hoover Dam project. In November 1931, it found 145,000 registered unemployed in Los Angeles County, 93,200 of them in the City of Los Angeles. The paper assured its readers that work was the answer and the “dole” (distribution of money, as opposed to work for food and shelter) was anathema “from President Hoover on down.” The County Board of Supervisors set a requirement of three-years’ residence before public relief could be given, cutting off newcomers from help. The County Welfare Department relied on private social agencies to handle http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern California Quarterly University of California Press

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© 2019 by The Historical Society of Southern California
ISSN
0038-3929
eISSN
2162-8637
DOI
10.1525/scq.2019.101.4.462
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Squatters camped out in a Hoover Town during the Depression. Security Pacific National Bank Collection, Los Angeles Public Library, 00041968. Southern California Quarterly, Vol. 101, No. 4, pp. 462–463. ISSN 0038-3929, eISSN 2162-8637. © 2019 by The Historical Society of Southern California. All rights reserved. Request permission to photocopy or reproduce article content at the University of California Press’s Reprints and Permissions web page, https://www.ucpress.edu/journals/reprints-permissions. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1525/scq.2019.101.4.462. 462 THE HISTORIAN’S EYE n the early years of the Great Depression, the Los Angeles Times reported that thousands of unemployed “moochers,” vagabonds,” I and “able-bodied beggars,” were flocking to Los Angeles, attracted by the sunny climate and rumors of jobs available on the Hoover Dam project. In November 1931, it found 145,000 registered unemployed in Los Angeles County, 93,200 of them in the City of Los Angeles. The paper assured its readers that work was the answer and the “dole” (distribution of money, as opposed to work for food and shelter) was anathema “from President Hoover on down.” The County Board of Supervisors set a requirement of three-years’ residence before public relief could be given, cutting off newcomers from help. The County Welfare Department relied on private social agencies to handle

Journal

Southern California QuarterlyUniversity of California Press

Published: Nov 1, 2019

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