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“That’s Why They Call It Window Pain”

“That’s Why They Call It Window Pain” We are both first-generation women PhDs who survived traumatic, abusive childhoods, and found ourselves caretakers of those who once cared for us, in the height of COVID-19 lockdowns. The pandemic complicated our responsibilities in un/comfortable and un/expected ways, as care of parents and academic positions, all differently fragile, required negotiating dis/connections between academia and family, all while the virus and uncertainty hung thick in the air. This article is written as a collaborative travelogue with personal pictures and narratives, to emphasize our traversing back and forth between these worlds, and often pausing on our journeys to rest, to worry, to cry, and to celebrate, in the in-between spaces. Gloria Anzaldúa’s (2000; Anzaldúa & Keating, 2002) discussions of liminalities as uncomfortable and sometimes desirable and sometimes intentional guide our journeys, as does Sara Ahmed’s (2017) emphasis on the power to stretch spaces of discomfort to find pleasure and comfort in traveling through/settling into liminal spaces. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Departures in Critical Qualitative Research University of California Press

“That’s Why They Call It Window Pain”

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References (4)

Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© 2022 by The Regents of the University of California
ISSN
2333-9489
eISSN
2333-9497
DOI
10.1525/dcqr.2022.11.3.6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We are both first-generation women PhDs who survived traumatic, abusive childhoods, and found ourselves caretakers of those who once cared for us, in the height of COVID-19 lockdowns. The pandemic complicated our responsibilities in un/comfortable and un/expected ways, as care of parents and academic positions, all differently fragile, required negotiating dis/connections between academia and family, all while the virus and uncertainty hung thick in the air. This article is written as a collaborative travelogue with personal pictures and narratives, to emphasize our traversing back and forth between these worlds, and often pausing on our journeys to rest, to worry, to cry, and to celebrate, in the in-between spaces. Gloria Anzaldúa’s (2000; Anzaldúa & Keating, 2002) discussions of liminalities as uncomfortable and sometimes desirable and sometimes intentional guide our journeys, as does Sara Ahmed’s (2017) emphasis on the power to stretch spaces of discomfort to find pleasure and comfort in traveling through/settling into liminal spaces.

Journal

Departures in Critical Qualitative ResearchUniversity of California Press

Published: Sep 1, 2022

Keywords: Narratives; Travelogue; Family; First generation; Liminality

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