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Surviving (Black) Together

Surviving (Black) Together How do Black feminism and womanism foster interconnectedness to one another and the sacred? What knowledges manifest through collective practices of wondering and wandering together? This essay provides reflections on our own engagements with creative-relational inquiry, manifested through our collective practice, Hill L. Waters, a scholar–artist collective rooted in love, Black queer resistance, and art as activism. Organized around and through three poems, this poetic essay is an offering of creative-relational inquiry, and it narrates our process of collectivity. Ultimately, this essay demonstrates how collectivity as a writing practice, political commitment, and identity translates Black feminist and womanist theory into praxis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Departures in Critical Qualitative Research University of California Press

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© 2020 by the Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. Request permission to photocopy or reproduce article content at the University of California Press's Reprints and Permissions web page, http://www.ucpress.edu/journals.php?p=reprints
ISSN
2333-9489
eISSN
2333-9497
DOI
10.1525/dcqr.2020.9.2.53
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

How do Black feminism and womanism foster interconnectedness to one another and the sacred? What knowledges manifest through collective practices of wondering and wandering together? This essay provides reflections on our own engagements with creative-relational inquiry, manifested through our collective practice, Hill L. Waters, a scholar–artist collective rooted in love, Black queer resistance, and art as activism. Organized around and through three poems, this poetic essay is an offering of creative-relational inquiry, and it narrates our process of collectivity. Ultimately, this essay demonstrates how collectivity as a writing practice, political commitment, and identity translates Black feminist and womanist theory into praxis.

Journal

Departures in Critical Qualitative ResearchUniversity of California Press

Published: May 1, 2020

Keywords: Collectivity; Vulnerability; Poetic inquiry; Queerness; Race

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