Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Schubert: Family Matters

Schubert: Family Matters Certain anomalous events in the history of Franz Schubert's family raise the possibility that he and his family inhabited a more tumultuous and conflict-ridden domestic universe than has been suspected. Among these are a series of painful losses in his mother's early life, the out-of-wedlock conception of Schubert's eldest brother, Ignaz, and Ignaz's subsequent omission from a schedule of heirs to some family property, along with his extended relegation to the lowly post of assistant teacher for more than a quarter century, until the death of his father, Franz Theodor Schubert, in 1830. In the background of these anomalies is the young Franz Theodor's unexpectedly rapid rise to prosperity in his profession, in which he and his sons had the decisive support of Bishop Josef Spendou, Vienna's superintendent of elementary schools, who was regarded as their "benefactor." Spendou's remarkably extensive devotion to the family's interests�including supplying a "scholarship" for Ignaz and a valued schoolteacher's post for young Ferdinand�opens for inspection several possibilities--that he may have been Ignaz's biological father, and that he and Schubert's parents may have entered into an arrangement whereby he furnished material and professional support to them in exchange for their raising his son as their own. Ultimately, when Franz Theodor died, Ignaz became the sole inheritor of the family's prosperous school, perhaps thereby closing the circle of pledges and obligations that bound Bishop Spendou and the Schuberts together. Left unexamined here are the potential reactions of Schubert and his siblings to their presumed knowledge of these veiled arrangements. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png 19th-Century Music University of California Press

Schubert: Family Matters

19th-Century Music , Volume 28 (1) – Jul 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-california-press/schubert-family-matters-DsxiVUi8p1
Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
Copyright © by the University of California Press
ISSN
0148-2076
eISSN
1533-8606
DOI
10.1525/ncm.2004.28.1.3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Certain anomalous events in the history of Franz Schubert's family raise the possibility that he and his family inhabited a more tumultuous and conflict-ridden domestic universe than has been suspected. Among these are a series of painful losses in his mother's early life, the out-of-wedlock conception of Schubert's eldest brother, Ignaz, and Ignaz's subsequent omission from a schedule of heirs to some family property, along with his extended relegation to the lowly post of assistant teacher for more than a quarter century, until the death of his father, Franz Theodor Schubert, in 1830. In the background of these anomalies is the young Franz Theodor's unexpectedly rapid rise to prosperity in his profession, in which he and his sons had the decisive support of Bishop Josef Spendou, Vienna's superintendent of elementary schools, who was regarded as their "benefactor." Spendou's remarkably extensive devotion to the family's interests�including supplying a "scholarship" for Ignaz and a valued schoolteacher's post for young Ferdinand�opens for inspection several possibilities--that he may have been Ignaz's biological father, and that he and Schubert's parents may have entered into an arrangement whereby he furnished material and professional support to them in exchange for their raising his son as their own. Ultimately, when Franz Theodor died, Ignaz became the sole inheritor of the family's prosperous school, perhaps thereby closing the circle of pledges and obligations that bound Bishop Spendou and the Schuberts together. Left unexamined here are the potential reactions of Schubert and his siblings to their presumed knowledge of these veiled arrangements.

Journal

19th-Century MusicUniversity of California Press

Published: Jul 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.