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Schubert (1928)

Schubert (1928) THEODOR W. ADORNO Schubert Schubert (1928) THEODOR W. ADORNO Translated by Jonathan Dunsby and Beate Perrey Introduction Adorno was twenty-five when he wrote the essay “Schubert” in 1928. It was first published in the same year to open a special issue devoted to the centennial of Schubert’s death in the leading music journal Die Musik. More than three decades later, in 1964, when invited by his publisher Suhrkamp to prepare a collection of his most important critical writings on music, Adorno chose “Schubert” to be part of what became the volume Moments musicaux, named after Schubert’s famous collection for the piano. By this time, five years before his death in 1969, Adorno had produced hundreds of music-critical essays. Selecting “Schubert” for reprint alongside fifteen further texts, including such seminal pieces as “Spätstil Beethovens” (Late Style in Beethoven) (1937) and “Verfremdetes Hauptwerk: Zur Missa Solemnis” (Alienated Masterpiece: The Missa Solemnis) (1959), indicates that Adorno regarded “Schubert” to be of lasting critical and epistemological significance. Indeed, in the foreword of the 1964 edition, the philosopher judged “Schubert” to be his “first comprehensive . . . study of the meaning of music.”1 Now three-quarters of a century old, Adorno’s “Schubert” has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png 19th-Century Music University of California Press

Schubert (1928)

19th-Century Music , Volume 29 (1) – Jul 1, 2005

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
Copyright © by the University of California Press
ISSN
0148-2076
eISSN
1533-8606
DOI
10.1525/ncm.2005.29.1.3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THEODOR W. ADORNO Schubert Schubert (1928) THEODOR W. ADORNO Translated by Jonathan Dunsby and Beate Perrey Introduction Adorno was twenty-five when he wrote the essay “Schubert” in 1928. It was first published in the same year to open a special issue devoted to the centennial of Schubert’s death in the leading music journal Die Musik. More than three decades later, in 1964, when invited by his publisher Suhrkamp to prepare a collection of his most important critical writings on music, Adorno chose “Schubert” to be part of what became the volume Moments musicaux, named after Schubert’s famous collection for the piano. By this time, five years before his death in 1969, Adorno had produced hundreds of music-critical essays. Selecting “Schubert” for reprint alongside fifteen further texts, including such seminal pieces as “Spätstil Beethovens” (Late Style in Beethoven) (1937) and “Verfremdetes Hauptwerk: Zur Missa Solemnis” (Alienated Masterpiece: The Missa Solemnis) (1959), indicates that Adorno regarded “Schubert” to be of lasting critical and epistemological significance. Indeed, in the foreword of the 1964 edition, the philosopher judged “Schubert” to be his “first comprehensive . . . study of the meaning of music.”1 Now three-quarters of a century old, Adorno’s “Schubert” has

Journal

19th-Century MusicUniversity of California Press

Published: Jul 1, 2005

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